Silver Maple companion planting

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Stephen Schram, Mar 24, 2020.

  1. Stephen Schram

    Stephen Schram New Member

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    I recently moved into a house on Skeena Street, near Hastings. The streets are lined with very large trees, maples are running down Skeena. All of the garden beds that are around my house are thick with roots, and appear to out competing all the perennials planted there, even the 4 foot tall beds up close to my house. After a little research I am assuming they are silver maples as they seem to be the most root invasive.

    2 questions:
    1. Is there a way to confirm with the city which type of maple they are?
    2. Is there any type of ground cover, or possible ornamental grass, or perennial that can survive with these type of conditions under big maples?
    I am aware that my only option may be a redesign with containers or protected beds to keep the roots out. Thanks for any help you can give me!
     
  2. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    This is not a suggestion, but a comment on question 1 about the trees. From what I can see on an old version of the Vancouver Street Trees map, most of the trees on Skeena are Norway Maples. I can't find a route to the current map on the city's website, but I did link to it in an email recently:
    Street trees
    I'll leave you to do your own search. Not all the street tree data is accurate, but Norway Maples are probably listed correctly.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2020
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    All large growing species of maples can be hard to garden under, once they are big enough - there being a dense mat of roots present is not a specific characteristic. Features of their tops including branching, bark and leaves should be used to identify them. If looking up Norway maple does not immediately confirm that is what yours are.

    Whatever the maple species there it sounds like you are going to have to change your plant choices to those kinds that are able to succeed beneath shady and competitive deciduous trees.
     
  4. Stephen Schram

    Stephen Schram New Member

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    Thanks for the tree ID help. Any ideas as to what plant for Vancouver will work in a dry shady area? I would think ferns and hostas, but the 3 fern that were there when we moved don't look very healthy and are stunted
     

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