September 2023 in the garden - there are still FLOWERS

Discussion in 'Talk about UBC Botanical Garden' started by wcutler, Sep 8, 2023.

  1. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Douglas Justice, at September in the Garden 2023 - UBC Botanical Garden, says that "summer-blooming plants often continue pumping out their flowers as long as the sun shines", and yes, they're still doing it. The blog starts with the Fuchsia magellanica "prominently displayed" next to the welcome sign on the entrance plaza.
    Fuchsia magellanica_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_151743.jpg Fuchsia magellanica_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_151757.jpg Fuchsia magellanica_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_151815.jpg
    Here is the welcome sign, with Hesperantha coccinea in front.
    Hesperantha coccinea and Welcome Sign_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_151836.jpg Hesperantha coccinea_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_151843.jpg

    Nearby is Fuchsia 'Little Giant', an F. magellanica hybrid.
    Fuchsia 'Little Giant'_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_164345.jpg Fuchsia 'Little Giant'_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_164437.jpg Fuchsia 'Little Giant'_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_164443.jpg

    Mentioned as a fuchsia look-alike, hence its common name California fuchsia, here is Epilobium canum subsp. latifolium, in the Pacific Slope garden and in the Alpine Garden North American section.
    Epilobium canum subsp. latifolium_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_155030.jpg Epilobium canum subsp. latifolium_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_155049.jpg Epilobium canum subsp. latifolium_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_161411.jpg Epilobium canum subsp. latifolium_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_161426.jpg

    Here are Epilobium canum subsp. canum - I was surprised by the feathery seeds on this
    Epilobium canum subsp. canum_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_161530.jpg Epilobium canum subsp. canum_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_161540.jpg Epilobium canum subsp. canum_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_161559.jpg
    and Epilobium canum subsp. canum 'Sir Cedric Morris'.
    Epilobium canum subsp. canum 'Sir Cedric Morris'_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_160645.jpg Epilobium canum subsp. canum 'Sir Cedric Morris'_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_160653.jpg
     
  2. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Back to the entrance plaza for a bit, as well as just past the garden entrance, Hylotelephium are in bloom now here and all over the city. If you want to keep calling these sedums, you're in luck, because that's one of the common names (stonecrop is another), so no-one will ever be the wiser. If you want to want to be au courant, Douglas gave the pronunciation one year as "high-low-tell-eff-ee-um" (Featured Plants in August 2020 in the Neighbourhood - UBC Botanical Garden), and my mnemonic to remember it has been "hi-low-telephone".
    Hylotelephium spectabile are supposed to have opposite leaves, but this is supposed to be H. spectabile.
    Hylotelephium spectabile_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_152436.jpg Hylotelephium spectabile_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_152453.jpg
    These are H. spectabile Brilliant Group. These more clearly have opposite leaves.
    Hylotelephium spectabile Brilliant Group_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_152043.jpg Hylotelephium spectabile Brilliant Group_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_152047.jpg Hylotelephium spectabile Brilliant Group_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_152305.jpg Hylotelephium spectabile Brilliant Group_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_152331.jpg Hylotelephium spectabile Brilliant Group_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_152345.jpg
    Hylotelephium ‘Herbstfreude’-autumn joy have alternate leaves.
    Hylotelephium ‘Herbstfreude’-Autumn Joy_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_151940.jpg Hylotelephium ‘Herbstfreude’-Autumn Joy_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_151946.jpg Hylotelephium ‘Herbstfreude’-Autumn Joy_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_152003.jpg
    From the neighbourhood blog linked to above, "autumn joy is a hybrid of H. spectabile and H. telephium. Hylotelephium telephium (orpine) is native from Europe to Japan and is known for a number of purple-green-leaved mauve-pink-flowered cultivars such as ‘Matrona’." Presumably the autumn joy alternate leaves come from the orpine side of the cross, so that got me a little confused looking at this H. telephium 'Matrona'; Douglas tells me it's easy to oversimplify things in this genus. Anyway, here is the 'Matrona' in the Contemporary Garden, with great pink stems.
    Hylotelephium telephium 'Matrona'_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_155343.jpg Hylotelephium telephium 'Matrona'_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_155343c.jpg Hylotelephium telephium 'Matrona'_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_155351.jpg Hylotelephium telephium 'Matrona'_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_155401.jpg

    I found a label on this white flowered Hylotelephium erythrostichum and got excited thinking it would be the name for the white-flowered plant above, just on the east side of the same plot, but that one seems to be H. spectabile and not the same as this.
    Hylotelephium erythrostictum_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_152934.jpg Hylotelephium erythrostictum_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_152944.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2023
  3. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Here are some millets from the food garden, and the sign again. Linda Layne reminded me that there are several plants in totally different genera that are called millet. They are all in the Poaceae family though.
    Millet chart_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_163122.jpg

    Proso, Panicum miliaceum - it's the droopy one in this photo
    Millet - Panicum miliaceum - Proso_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_163055.jpg
    The upright one in the above photo is
    White millet - Echinochloa frumentacea
    Millet-White Millet-Echinochloa frumentacea_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_163139.jpg

    Pearl millet - Pennisetum glaucum and P. glaucum 'Purple Majesty'
    Millet - Pennisetum glaucum-Pearl Millet_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_163111.jpg Millet-Pearl Millet - Pennisetum glaucum 'Purple Majesty'_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_163152.jpg

    Foxtail millet - Setaria italica
    Millet-Foxtail millet - Setaria italica_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_163213.jpg Millet-Foxtail millet - Setaria italica_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_163220.jpg
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Douglas's list included Kniphofia, in the African section of the Alpine Garden. Ones he mentioned may be the ones shown here: Kniphofia linearifolia on the left, Kniphofia triangularis subsp. obtusifolia on the right.
    Kniphofia_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_160131.jpg
    This little one is Kniphofia albescens
    Kniphofia albescens_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_160008.jpg

    I only found one flower spike of Watsonia fourcadei
    Watsonia fourcadei_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_160311.jpg Watsonia fourcadei_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_160327.jpg

    In the same section are these good-sized Helichrysum trilineatum, with such tiny ray flowers that they're hardly noticeable, even though several flower heads are bundled together. On the first photo you can see three linear veins on the leaves, which I'm assuming is what the trilineatum attribute in the name is about.
    Helichrysum trilineatum_UBCBG-LAF2_Cutler_20230907_161622.jpg Helichrysum trilineatum_UBCBG-LAF2_Cutler_20230907_161657.jpg Helichrysum trilineatum_UBCBG-LAF2_Cutler_20230907_161701.jpg Helichrysum trilineatum_UBCBG-LAF2_Cutler_20230907_161718.jpg

    In the same section is Felicia drakensbergensis, blue daisy bush, making its first appearance in this forum, though others of this genus have appeared elsewhere.
    Felicia drakensbergensis_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_161107.jpg Felicia drakensbergensis_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_161121.jpg Felicia drakensbergensis_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_161131.jpg
    Here is another blue-flowered Asteraceae, Erigeron glaucus, from California/Oregon, in the Pacific Slope Garden.
    Erigeron glaucus_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_154943.jpg Erigeron glaucus_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_155000.jpg

    Back in the Asian Garden, I've mentioned before that the Kirengeshoma palmata on the north side of Upper Asian Way open later than the Kirengeshoma palmata Koreana Group on the south side of the path, though if there is any difference in amount of sun hitting the plants, I would think the ones on the north side would get a bit more sun. Here is the plant on the north side, with only flowers:
    Kirengeshoma palmata_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_163931.jpg Kirengeshoma palmata_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_163945.jpg
    and Kirengeshoma palmata Koreana Group on the south side, all fruits.
    Kirengeshoma palmata Koreana Group_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_163955.jpg Kirengeshoma palmata Koreana Group_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_164004.jpg
     
  5. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I forgot one mentioned in the blog - Verbena bonariensis, looking beautiful in the food garden with Amaranthus 'Hop Red Dye'.
    Verbena bonariensis_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_162822.jpg Verbena bonariensis_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_162627.jpg Verbena bonariensis_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_162603.jpg
     
  6. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    @Daniel Mosquin posted Ceratotheca triloba, South African foxglove, on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10160632577860781&set=a.10150652226110781, which reminded me that I saw it last week too but forgot to include it here. Daniel wrote that it's in the Pedaliaceae family, same as sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum, which has flowers similar in shape and fuzziness). It's not expected to be winter-hardy, but the garden is hoping to regrow it from harvested seeds. Here's my photo.
    Ceratotheca triloba_UBCBG_Cutler_20230907_160106.jpg
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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  8. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Ha-ha, is that what Douglas Justice meant by his reference to the "expansive patch" of it? I see it's on the watch list for Washington State. South American plant. The article doesn't mention BC, maybe we still need to warm up a bit before it's a problem here.
     
  9. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    CPNWH Search Results (pnwherbaria.org)
     
  10. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    OK, re: Verbena bonariensis, "Weed in gaps in cement steps around courtyard sculpture, with Geranium robertianum..." at the UBC Music Building. And there is a "Several appearing in recent topsoil used for landscaping". Nine mainland and one Vancouver Island listings.
    E-Flora BC Atlas Page (ubc.ca) says "This garden escape shows up from time to time, mostly in soil dumps or near habitations, but does not persist", with status as unlisted and not established.
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Notice that although most of the records were for one or a few individuals Record #1 was based on a site with 30 and #10 with 20 present. And in the latter case the collection was made in 2002. So, I think it's well established by now that the Lower Mainland climate is not a problem for the species.
     
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  12. Margot

    Margot Renowned Contributor 10 Years

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    I was shocked to read on Wikipedia that Verbena bonariensis can "grow to 6 ft (180 cm) tall and can spread to 3 ft (90 cm) wide."

    It grows from seed every year in my garden but never more than 30 inches tall and never more than one single stalk.

    I wonder what I'm doing wrong (or right).
     
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