Identification: Seen near Gentian Lake on Cypress Mountain

Discussion in 'Pacific Northwest Native Plants' started by englak, Sep 6, 2020.

  1. englak

    englak Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    This is growing in the forest at the edge of the trail. A beautiful little ground cover. Any ideas?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    2,322
    Likes Received:
    1,212
    Location:
    Nanoose Bay, BC Canada
    Linnaea borealis, native to BC but also circumboreal. Said to be a favourite of Carl Linnaeus so he named it after himself. It is also called Twinberry for the twin pink flowers that arise on short stalks above the foliage in spring. If you have a large enough patch, their fragrance should waft up to you nose, saving you from bending over to enjoy it.

    [​IMG]
    Notes:
    Two subspecies occur in BC:
    1. Corollas 9-11 mm long, narrowly bell-shaped, flaring from within the calyces, tubes very short or sometimes absent................... ssp. borealis
    1. Corollas 10-16 mm long, funnel-shaped, tubes about equalling or surpassing the calyces...................ssp. longiflora (Torr.) Hult.
    Source: The Illustrated Flora of British Columbia

    Linnaea borealis - Wikipedia
     
    Silver surfer likes this.
  3. englak

    englak Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Thanks! I appreciate your help.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,138
    Likes Received:
    360
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Not quite; named by Gronovius, who named it after his star pupil. Gronovius' naming was pre-1753 (the official start date for botanical names), so his authorship is not given in botanical authorship citations.

    Linnaeus, in his Critica Botanica (1737), says:
    Original (in Latin) here.

    The English name is Twinflower (not -berry!).
     
  5. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

    Messages:
    1,779
    Likes Received:
    621
    Location:
    South Okanagan & Greater Vancouver, BC Canada
    Yes I know it as twin flower (not berry)

    I have seen it up the mountain in dry area under fir trees approx 700 feet above sea level above Langdale ferry terminal BC.

    It would have climate influence fr both Howe Sound and Strait of Georgia

    I think its identification is in those handy Lone Pine books commonly avail at book shops or museum / national park gift shops etc. (I think on BC Ferries too - in newsstand) Home

    Édit: i think we refer to that short little « dogwood » flower as twinberry - it likes damp woodland shade west of Cascade / Coast Ranges

    More édit - clearly I am wrong - that’s bunchberry Cornus canadensis - Wikipedia
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2020
  6. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    2,322
    Likes Received:
    1,212
    Location:
    Nanoose Bay, BC Canada
    Yes, I do know the name for Linnaea borealis is Twinflower. Typo - sorry. It took me years to find out its identity back when I became interested in native plans and was unfamiliar with reference books I might have used. Pre-Kruckeberg too.

    Linnaeus, in his Critica Botanica (1737), says:
    "Linnaea was named by the celebrated Gronovius and is a plant of Lapland, lowly, insignificant, disregarded, flowering but for a brief space — after Linnaeus, who resembles it".


    How does Linnaeus resemble Twinflower? Surely not that he is also "lowly, insignificant, disregarded"? Was he trying to be humble or amusing?
     
    Georgia Strait likes this.

Share This Page