seedling question

Discussion in 'Maples' started by joclyn, May 28, 2011.

  1. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    heya, folks :)

    i've got a red-leaf japanese maple seedling growing in one bed - unknown variety; definitely not a dwarf type, though. it's 5 or 6 years old now, not sure because of where it's located...

    this thing actually popped up right where i was going to put one in the middle of this one bed. the problem is that initially, i didn't see it because of the vinca in that bed, so, that's why i'm not sure of how old it is.

    the vinca is why i'm posting. i wanted to clear some of it out and away from the seedling so that the tree could grow better and i found that the trunk is crooked because it had to grow around/through the vines of the vinca.

    the bottom-most portion of the trunk is straight - about 1 1/2 inches - and then it curves almost completely back on itself for a couple inches before being straight again for a few more inches. all told, it's about 6 to 6 1/2 inches in length.

    what do i do to straighten this out?? i wouldn't mind a little bit of a bend especially if it was a dwarf type. normal growth pattern for this type is perfectly straight up with a Y at some point.

    so, can i wrap, or support with poles, this seedling so that the trunk straightens out?? diameter is small - not even as thick as a pencil yet, so, very flexible still and there's plenty of time to work to correct it. which would be the better technique?

    thanks!!!
     
  2. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    The best technique would be to do nothing and let it develop on its own.
     
  3. sasquatch

    sasquatch Active Member

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    Leaving it may add to the character of the tree, so doing nothing certainly is an option. If you want to straighten the trunks, they make clamps for Bonsai to do just what you want.
    http://www.dallasbonsai.com/store/branch_benders_jacks.html
    In tight spaces, it seems like this is your best option, although you could try and rig a home made version.
     
  4. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    sasquatch, thanks for the link AND the bonsai comment - i can probably use wire, like used with bonsai, to reshape it!

    kaitain, if it was just a bit of a bend, i'd leave it - this literally is a U shape and it just won't look right as the tree develops. i'll have to post a pic of it so you can see what i'm talking about.
     
  5. CSL

    CSL Active Member

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    Throw my vote in with the others - do absolutely nothing; nature led to the tree you see, let it go and simply enjoy it.

    Cheers,
    CSKL
     
  6. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    i went to take a pic of it today and wow! it's grown incredibly in the past two weeks (the last time i took a good look at it)!! more than two inches taller and it now has a nice Y to it!!

    the bend isn't so bad now either. it's more of an L shape now rather than a U. i may put a couple sticks in to help keep it a bit more upright, though, so that it does continue to straighten up.
     

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