Scorched Stewartia Pseudocamellia?

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Lynnedq, Sep 9, 2015.

  1. Lynnedq

    Lynnedq Member

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    Our 7-8 yr old Stewartia appears to be dying. Leaves are brown, curled up and scorched looking. This has happened to some extent in other years but is much more pronounced now, perhaps because of this summer's drought. Will it come back next spring, or is it time to replace it?
     
  2. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I'd wait, or scratch the bark to see if there is some green showing.
    The roots seem to like some cool shade and moisture.
     
  3. Keke

    Keke Active Member 10 Years

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    Many trees have been super-stressed due to the drought here. The recent rain and cooler weather should help your tree a great deal. If the tree hasn't lost all its leaves it's probably going to be fine -- it's only a month before the leaves would normally start falling, and as long as it hasn't been stressed too much previously an eight year old tree should have enough energy in reserve to bounce back. If we get a warm, dry autumn you might want to water it at the drip line with a soaker hose, or get one of those tree ring reservoirs that release water slowly. Watering near the trunk will not help, as the rootlets that take up water are out roughly even with the widest branches. Mornings are best -- not during the heat of the day.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Stewartia have no drought tolerance.
     
  5. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Hi Keke - your comment that trees should be watered at the drip line brings up a question I have had regarding the watering bags that I see placed around street trees to help keep them alive through this drought. To me, it seems that they would only deliver water down about a 2- to 3-foot diameter around the trunk. Maybe that's enough for tap-rooted trees but it's sure not the way I would choose to water trees (at the drip line.) Better than nothing perhaps. It will be interesting (hopefully not heartbreaking) to see how many are still alive next spring.
     
  6. Keke

    Keke Active Member 10 Years

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    I have been thinking about that, Margot. In the main, all the tree bags I've seen have been on young trees with quite narrow canopies, and thus the bag may in fact be watering at the drip line, or close to it. But it's a fair point.
     

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