Sarcococca hookeriana

Discussion in 'Botany Photo of the Day Submissions' started by Weekend Gardener, Feb 18, 2007.

  1. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Sarcococca hookeriana

    Diminutive flowers that pack a mighty fragrance.

    Sarcococca hookeriana 12feb07 (16) (Medium).jpg

    Sarcococca hookeriana 12feb07 (12) (Medium).jpg

    Sarcococca hookeriana 12feb07 (9) (Medium).jpg

    Sarcococca hookeriana 12feb07 (13) (Medium).jpg
     
  2. chuckrkc

    chuckrkc Active Member

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    I see it gets 1-2 feet tall and spreads. Good evergreen for shade (oh, it speaks to my heart, now). Hardy to zone 6 or 7, depending on the info source and plant. A little drought tolerant once established? What does it smell like?
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Dwarf tufted form humilis prevalent in cultivation here. Taller, brighter var. digyna more ornamental but rare.
     
  4. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    It smells very good.
     
  5. chuckrkc

    chuckrkc Active Member

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  6. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Smells heavenly - but then, that might be a matter of opinion. The point is - you can't help but notice the smell. It is very strong.

    The label on this one says Sarcococca hookeriana var humilis. This one is well behaved. It's in total but bright shade, with light reflected off the garage wall. Right now, it's about two feet tall. I doubt it will get any taller than that. The berries are dark, almost black and inconspicuous. I have it, and Skimmia japonica (grown in the vicinity) performing in tandem. The flowers of the Skimmia should be ready to throw it's own perfume around in late March, early April.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2007

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