Salmon Berry

Discussion in 'Pacific Northwest Native Plants' started by Miry, Mar 11, 2015.

  1. Miry

    Miry Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Gibsons BC Canada
    Does anybody know about the Salmon berry bush? Is it invasive?
     
  2. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor

    Messages:
    844
    Likes Received:
    594
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    If you are referring to Rubus spectabilis, it is native to the BC.

    "......native to the west coast of North America from west central Alaska to California. It is a shrub growing to 1–4 m tall, with perennial, not biennial woody stems (unlike other species) that are covered with fine prickles. The leaves are trifoliate, 7–22 cm long, the terminal leaflet larger than the two side leaflets. The leaf margins are toothed. The flowers are 2–3 cm diameter, with five purple petals; they are produced from early spring to early summer. The fruit matures in late summer to early autumn, and resembles a large yellow to orange-red raspberry 1.5–2 cm long with many drupelets.
    In the Pacific Northwest of North America the berries can ripen from mid-June to late July. Salmonberries are found in moist forests and stream margins, especially in the coastal forests...."
     
  3. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    10,204
    Likes Received:
    421
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Some might call it locally aggressive, as it can take over areas with a bit of time. But, simple enough to cut back if necessary.
     
  4. Miry

    Miry Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Gibsons BC Canada
    Thanks for your input.
    I understand that the hummingbirds love it but if it is invasive like the raspberries then it wouldn't be good.
    I have a new smaller garden to plant some bushes so I was thinking about it.
    I am a bird lover so I tend to plant for birds.
     
  5. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    694
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    gulf island, bc, canada
    In a small space, it will spread enough that you'll need to keep it cut back (as mentioned), but it's not nearly as aggressive as blackberry. You might want to consider a red flowering currant: it flowers very early, doesn't spread, and hummingbirds love it, as it provides forage for them when a lot of other things aren't in flower. If you have a trellis, fence or wall space, consider a honeysuckle vine (Lonicera periclymenum ‘Belgica’ is a good one)--hummingbirds will stake these out and visit them throughout the season.
     
  6. Miry

    Miry Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Gibsons BC Canada
    Thanks so much.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,564
    Likes Received:
    476
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Woody creeping root-stocks are hard to control manually.
     
  8. Miry

    Miry Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Gibsons BC Canada
    Thanks. I definitely won't be getting the Salmon Berry
     
  9. Tony Puddicombe

    Tony Puddicombe Active Member VCBF Cherry Scout

    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    One way I use to control plants with aggressive roots is to plant them in a lined planting hole. I love fruit from the saskatoon (Amelanchier alnifolia) and planted one 15 years ago in a hole lined with 18 inch deep painted metal sheeting.This week I moved the plant and the metal was still in good shape. It had prevented the majority of roots from invading the rest of the garden. What was interesting was mo st roots were within the metal lining but the plant had sent just one 2 inch diameter root straight down and then angling under the bottom of the metal. I had to cut this root, so time will tell how well the plant survives this transplanting.
    Another material that is effective is thick plastic sheeting. A local bamboo nursery sells it and the custom clamps to prevent roots sneaking by the overlap.
     
  10. Miry

    Miry Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Gibsons BC Canada
    That is good to know.
    I understand this Salmon Berry is a native plant so does get aggressive.
    I'm looking at getting a red currant bush and I just bought a honeysuckle yesterday called Scarlet Trumpet Honeysuckle Vine.
    I had a big cedar cut down so I'm replacing it with trees and bushes.
    I also had the stump removed and there is a lot of sawdust. Should I remove all of this?

    I am a bird lover so my planting is around this. To replace the cedar I have planted one Serbian spruce, two Chamaecy paris obtuse and I have ordered a Himalayan birch and Acer japonicum maple. It is hard to believe that I have taken one tree down to be replaced by five trees.

    Any suggestions for a dwarf maple to be grown in large porcelain pot?

    Thanks
     
  11. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    10,204
    Likes Received:
    421
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Not all native plants are aggressive -- and the other questions are veering off from the Pacific Northwest Native Plants forum topic. Maybe repost those into the Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest forum?
     
  12. Miry

    Miry Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Gibsons BC Canada
    Sorry but I can't figure out how to switch over to gardening in the Pacific Northwest?
     
  13. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    10,204
    Likes Received:
    421
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Click on either the banner saying UBC Botanical Garden Forums at the top of the page, or the UBC Botanical Garden Forums text below it (that goes: UBC Botanical Garden Forums > Pacific Northwest Native Plants), or on Forums Home on the lefthand sidebar.

    Then you will be on the main page, and can get to it from there.
     
  14. rootbboy

    rootbboy Active Member

    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    vancouver, Canada
    For the small maple, maybe acer glabrum var. douglasii. Also, Lonicera ciliosa for a native honeysuckle vine.
     

Share This Page