Saguaro blotchy

Discussion in 'Cacti and Succulents' started by Caesar, Sep 11, 2021 at 7:48 PM.

  1. Caesar

    Caesar New Member

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    I have a recently transplanted 7ft saguaro (3 weeks in the ground). No water except for day of transplant and one day of rain. It was oriented correctly upon transplant. I noticed starting on day 3 and ever since that tt has yellow blotchy areas on the Southwest side of it. Not sure what is going on with it. Some days it looks better than others. Some days it seems like it is getting worse. See attached photos. Any help deciphering what is happening would be appreciated.
     

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  2. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Last edited: Sep 11, 2021 at 11:51 PM
  3. mandarin

    mandarin Active Member 10 Years

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    Does that mean that the side with the blotches was facing southwest in its original location too?
     
  4. Caesar

    Caesar New Member

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    Yes
     
  5. Caesar

    Caesar New Member

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    It was professionally planted by a local nursery and up to this point it has been watered correctly this is why I am at a loss to what is happening.
     
  6. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    The professionals at your local nursery presumably would know what they are doing.

    It is interesting however that expert, Tim Elliott, in the article above says not to water at all for at least 6 months.
    "Plant the saguaro dry. This does not mean just a little water—it means none. Saguaros have a very high water content that is locked up in their tissues. This allows them to survive for extended periods without adding water. The stress of transplanting occasionally causes some rotting in the root area. If the plant and soil are dry, the saguaro’s evolved defenses halt the problem and the plant lives. This dry regimen should be followed through the first six months or more to give the plant its best chance of survival."
     

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