Rose of Sharon pests?

Discussion in 'Annuals, Biennials, Perennials, Ferns and Bulbs' started by WendyI, Aug 2, 2005.

  1. WendyI

    WendyI Member

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    Location:
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    Sorry, I'm not very good at remembering botanical names but I think this is actually the name for this shrub/tree.

    Anyway, one of mine seems to have holes all over the leaves on most of the bottom leaves. I've attached a pic but I'm a pretty bad photographer and I think my husband has our camera cranked so it might be large...sorry.

    It's fairly obvious to me that something is eating it but I'm not sure what it might be or how serious. I have other ROS plants in another area that do not seem to be affected and are already blooming...but this one seems slow to bloom...however there are buds so I do expect it to bloom soon.
     

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  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    That's actually a Hibiscus (a Hibiscus species), not a Rose of Sharon
     
  3. WendyI

    WendyI Member

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    It is a member of the Hibiscus family but here in Ontario we call it a Rose of Sharon....so yes hibiscus would be the correct identification.

    However, these "shrubs" and I quote since they can grow up to 20 feet, don't seem to be as susceptible to spider mite as the tropical variety and are winter hardy.
     
  4. Carol Ja

    Carol Ja Active Member 10 Years

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    As for the plant id, I don't know, but I can tell you that you have catapillars eating you leaves. If you look carefully, you might be able to find one. Chances are it is happening only when your not looking, my roses sometimes get the same ones.
    Carol Ja
     
  5. Puddleton

    Puddleton Active Member 10 Years

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    Hibiscus syriacus
    if only the bottom leaves have been munched than I wouldnt worry about it.Their remarkably tough
     
  6. Youngneg

    Youngneg Member

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    Yes i also have the same problem....and i see the pests....it is catapillers.What should i use to solve the problem.
     
  7. Puddleton

    Puddleton Active Member 10 Years

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    It would be best to identify what caterpillar it is and whether it has ecological benefits, detriments or benign. the damage that appears on the photo above would be considered minor or as military propagandists say "acceptable losses". If the caterpillrs are in numbers that could nail the plant then I would first try Dipel or bascillus thuringiensis (bacteria) or germ warfare. If theres only a few, either leave them to pupate or cut them into bite size pieces with your secateurs. The ants will do the rest of the work.
    Hope this helps and remember.
    for every action, there is a reaction. Spraying insecticides will create an imbalance between beneficials and pests. Most insecticides dispatch every critter they hit. The pests always return faster than the predators. Before you know it, you've become dependant on a bottle of nasty stuff to maintain your gardens so called health.
    Give and take whilst monitoring the critters behaviour and population is a kinder approach.
    I hope this helps.
    Its bedtime for this gardener now
     
  8. Carol Ja

    Carol Ja Active Member 10 Years

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    Pick the critters off and put them where you don't mind them eating lunch they might turn into a useful pollinator later. I usually send mine to the black berry patch, or to the local wild roses out back.
    Carol Ja
     
  9. WendyI

    WendyI Member

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    thanks so much for your replies! I have been monitoring the situation and will not be chemically treating anything. I am of the same mind when it comes to the use of chemicals and so far have never had to treat for anything in my life. I figure if critters get at anything I'll just have to replace it I guess or just decide not to grow that in my beds. Although I've been gardening for the past 15 years or so, I have only been perennial gardening for the past 5 years or so. I have yet to buy a plant that wasn't very hardy and non-prone to pests (ie. I don't have any roses...YET!).

    In any case, I have a two year old and two dogs so I'm not overly fond of any kind of chemical treatment, as can be evidenced by my lawn! LOL!

    Thanks again for the advice. Guess I have to brush up on my bugs!
     
  10. Tbolivar

    Tbolivar Member

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    Location:
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    Hi There

    I have posted a few requests for information about my windmill palms and had excellent replies. So, I wanted to add my observations about the large Rose of sharon we have in our back yard. (Langley BC) Zone 7b I think, someone may correct me.
    I guess when I read the last few comments about micro-climates I had to respond with my own little remark.

    We have a plant in the back-yard which is quite large, about 7-8 feet tall this year and very vigourous. It is in a notch between our deck and back stairs. It is directly outside the location where our Clothes dryer vents.

    Talk about warm on those cold winter day. (well as cold as its been getting in Langley these past years). This plant absolutely loves it there, but unfortunately the carpenter ants also love it and use it as a source of gooey foodstuff. They also use it to gain access to the nest I believe I cleaned out.

    I'll know next year when I replace the deck and stairs, which unfortunately means I will either have to move it or get rid of it. I'd like to move it, but its quite large at the butt, around 12" across where all the branches come up out of the ground. My other question is, can a plant of this size be moved? Can it be dug up, or separated, etc.

    My wife would like to keep it because it has absolutely beutifuly fragrant flowers, and it's beautiful when its covered in its blossoms.

    So, there's a few questions for the experts out there, and food for thought for the rest of us.

    Thanks all
     
  11. smivies

    smivies Active Member

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    A good non-toxic chemical control of bugs (especially soft bodied ones) that I use is simple insecticidal soap. You can buy the concentrate at Rona or ready made stuff. It's just potassium salts of fatty acids (old style soap, somewhat responsible for turning Lake Erie into bio soup many years ago), works on contact only, and has no residual effect on the bugs.

    Simon
     

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