Rose category identification - Old Garden?

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by Cassandra, Jun 17, 2008.

  1. Cassandra

    Cassandra Member

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    I recently bought a 1912 double brick home in Hamilton, ON Canada and inherited a garden from an 80+ year old lady that has no les than 13 different types of rose bushes.

    I have read all sorts of books, post, and persued various internet leads trying to determine if my 10' tall rose bushes bearing pink 4 petal yeloow centered roses can be trained to climb; the arching canes are ~ 1/2" in diameter and produce flowers in early June. In their wake huge hips are produced.

    I pruned the bejesus out of one of these shrubs yesterday 16 June suffering serious bodily harm .. lol .. just to see what might happen?

    I will attempt to post pics in the near future but hope that the description narrows things down for those so inclined to comment.

    Old Garden Rose is such an old vague category .. hoping to do better.

    A rose novice ;oP
     
  2. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Struggling to help on this, thought even simple roses had 5 petals. A really pricky one is Rosa rugosa,this also has big hips. But 5 petals!
    Any chance of a picture before every thing you cut down completely shrivels?
     
  3. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    the best time to prune roses is in the fall or in early spring. i usually do mine in the spring because i don't want late-season new growth damaged by frost. just my preference...most people prune them in the fall...

    deadheading blooms will promote re-blooming on the varieties that will bloom again (not all do). just cut the hip off as some will get new buds from the old bud-stem.

    can you post some pics of them?? whole bush as well as the flowers (close-ups) - maybe we can id them for you.
     
  4. Cassandra

    Cassandra Member

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    Greetings 'Luddite & Joclyn',

    Thank you so much for expressing interest in helping me out ... I have a crazy commuter-based life which limits me to doing cool stuff like gardening only on the weekends ;o(

    I have a 4-day holiday this weekend thanks to a generous employer (giving us Monday off) & Canada Day. I plan to get some pics posted over the weekend .. unfortunately my 4 petalled mystery rose is no longer blooming and I think it was all done before I even thought to post - most of June has been rain here in the greater Toronto Area - good for plants (perhaps) bad for gardeners getting things done ... lol - it's raining again (quite ferociously I might add) as I type.

    But I have other angels that are happily blooming and other greenery to capture on 'film' ;o) Most of the fabulous smelling beauties grow in clusters with really skinny stems (no cutting roses ;o( )

    I plan to take
    a) full shrub pics (to indicate size, shape & growth habit);
    b) close up of leaf pattern; and
    c) close up of flower (as available)

    If you can think of anything else that may be of help I appreciate you letting me know.

    Also wonder: I assume that I have to post my pics to a pic-sharing site and just include a link in the body of the message? I didn't see any instructions on including pics/attachments within this forum?

    Thanks again for your interest in helping me 'label' my beautiful roses so that I can treat them appropriately ;O)

    Cheers,
    Ruth
     
  5. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Help on how to attach pics is given in the side panel to the right of this screen.It is easier for us all if you post directly here, praps a few pics at a time.Hope this helps
     
  6. Hermit

    Hermit Active Member

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    I did a search for a friend who thought they had a four-petalled rose but later realized they were mistaken. However, in the process I learned that there does exist a rose similar to what you describe.
    Check out; R. sericea pteracantha
     
  7. Cassandra

    Cassandra Member

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    I'm back .. was working on my brick retaining wall and had to stop because (as usual this summer) it started to rain .. lol.

    I have a bunch of pictures I am going to post in support of helping me better care for my rose family through your help in identifying who they might be ;o)

    Wish me luck .. moving on to Attach Files section ...

    Successfully (I think) attached 9 pics.

    The 'CaneMadness' pic shows the growth of the pale pink with yellow centre I originally thought had 4 petals ... as can be surmised from looking at the 'Hips ...' photo, it probably had 5 petals. It is the first to bloom in my garden in SW Ontario and only blooms once. Bees like it but it has no real fragrance and is a free standing bush not well placed to train/support .. any advice on how to support it would be much appreciated as it is currently drooping all over the place as can be seen in the CaneMadness photo ;O)

    The 'Fiercely fragrant' multiple petal pink has long slender canes, producing multiple blooms per section; sadly it does not have a strong enough stalk to make it a good cut flower so I merely enjoy its fragrance along side my back stoop - I am actually supporting it on a renegade beech nut sappling for now because I don't know how else to train it given that it sits 4 feet away from the house at the side of the stoop railing. It blooms second but also only once; perhaps pruning after first would encourage more?

    The 'Rambling rose' is 2 feet away from my neighbours fence behind my 5+ foot phlox! Currently it is behaving more like ground cover than anything else .. though I have introduced some of its dainty canes to my dying lilac bush.

    The 'Another skinny...' rose is at my back fence underneath an apple tree. I am encouraging it to wrap around a stray wire running between the pole that holds up the clothes line and another pole of questionable use.

    'Delicate pink...' is happily living next door to fiercely fragrant yielding similar training support challenges.

    The 'Salmon coloured...' is just in front of the rambling rose and seems to be the least active grower. It seems to be more of your standard rose bush variety (i.e., no long horizontal canes - just straight up growth)

    'Hardy huge canes .. ' is no where near anything that I can support it on .. it is virtually a tree!! I can't even reach the vertical growth that is stemming out of the curved canes

    'New Pink addition' is the only one currently flower (early Aug) and appears to have a vertical growth habit, living just in front of the rambler (who is no longer flower) beside my beetle infested virburum & dying lilac.

    Lastly, as a general HELP!! question: What should I do about the 1/2" thick suckers that are growing vertically out of the canes of my 'hardy canes' and 'hips pale pink' bushes?

    Truly a victim of an adopted rose garden needing serious help .. please send handsome gardner ;o)
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I've moved this to the rose forum, where perhaps it will pique the interest of some of the rosarians on the forums.
     
  9. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Some of your rose plants are huge! I have not been able to ID any of them. But pictures #2, #3 and #8 may be hybrid multifloras. Better closeup pictures of whole blooms, buds, leaves and stipules, thorns may help.

    However, I just want to suggest not to be too hasty in removing the so called "sucker" canes you mentioned until you are sure that they are suckers. These roses are so old that it is possible that they have taken over with their own roots, in which case the canes are not suckers, but new canes in the current season's growth.
     

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