Robelini Palm

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by DZak, Feb 26, 2008.

  1. DZak

    DZak Member

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    I recently bought 2, 7 gallon Robelini Palms to plant in my back yard in Las Vegas, NV.
    I've never planted Palms before. Can anyone tell me how deep and wide the hole should be and what kind of soil prep I should do? I am planting them in an area which currently has grass. They will be getting a lot of sun as the back yard faces west.
    How much water do I need to provide (I have a bubbler system).
    Thanks for any and all help!
     
  2. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    This info is from The Tropical Look Robert Lee Riffle Timber Press
    "The tree is native to tropical rainforests where it grows in clearings or along riverbanks. It is a water lover and needs rich humusy soil in which it grows moderately quick. Without the abundant water and non-fertile soil the palm grows quite slowly and never develops the great beauty of which it is capable."

    Beyond those comments, Phoenix roebelinii is capable of light frosts of short duration once established. Planting depth should be at the same level as it is in the potted container. Don't heap soil up onto the trunk. I wonder too about the blistering Las Vegas summer sun, and the potential burn damage to the fronds during those times. Routine misting would also help in your arid climate. Remember these are rainforest palms.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  3. DZak

    DZak Member

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    Thanks for the info! I am worried about the lows of 28 in winter and the 115 summers! I guess whoever buys for the stores (Costco in this case) sends them to all areas of the country regardless of fitness of the growing area! Well I will give it a try and hope for the best. If my house were big enough I'd try them inside instead :)
    They are really lovely, I hope they do ok.
    Dzak
     
  4. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    out of curiosity, i did some googling and learned a few things :)

    the correct name is: phoenix roebelenii

    it is hardy to about 24 degrees without frost. if potential for frost occurs, wrap the leaves and trunk with burlap.

    it grows better/faster in full sun, does need a good amount of water when the temps are higher. will develop a really good root system.

    since it gets SO hot where you are, the west facing location might be a detriment. that afternoon sun is the hottest! is the location shaded in mid-afternoon?? if not, you may want to think about another location as the extreme temps you get coupled with the hot; burning sunlight will definitely scorch the leaves and may keep the palm from becoming established.

    if you could locate it in an eastern or southern exposure that has some shade during the hot afternoon period, i think it would do better.

    you'll definitely need to water it well (daily) when the temps get above 100 for days on end.

    good luck!! it's a beautiful palm and i hope you succeed with it!
     
  5. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    " I guess whoever buys for the stores (Costco in this case) sends them to all areas of the country regardless of fitness of the growing area!"

    True ... The Home Depot sells them here and they don't stand a snowballs chance ...
    If you don't mind me asking, what where those 7 gallon sized ones selling for?

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  6. DZak

    DZak Member

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    $36.99 I believe.
     
  7. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Thanks DZak ... I'd be most concerned about the 115 degree (seemingly relentless) days summer heat. They'd do fine I reckon as long as the roots got regular watering and the afternoon shade was sufficent. Periodic misting would be benefical too.

    Cheers, LPN. (Keep us posted)
     
  8. Dave-Florida

    Dave-Florida Active Member

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    Re: Roebelinii Palm

    They do well in central Florida, although they've become popular only in the past 15 years or so. Inasmuch as our steambath climate is utterly unlike the Las Vegas desert...

    I recently picked up a cute baby Nolina nelsonii, tree sacahuista or blue beargrass. It's evidently from the mountains of Tamaulipas, Mexico, so might perhaps be happier in Las Vegas than Florida.
     
  9. DZak

    DZak Member

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    I spoke to a co-worker tonight who said she has the Robelini Palms and in winter frost wraps the trunks in burlap (she says leasves still brown but they grow new green), and apparently regular water in summer they seemto be fine. I'll have to ask her about sun exposure, as mine will be in afternoon sun. Although I believe the tags say full sun or partial shade. Hmmm. I'll check the tags again tomorrow.

    We are planting them on Tuesday. Will keep you posted :)
     
  10. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    yes, they can definitely handle full sun.

    my comment was based on the full sun in conjunction with the extremely high air temps you have. that combination may cause it to struggle. you will definitely need to keep an eye on it while it's establishing the root system.

    since you have someone local growing the same thing, definitely ask them for input on if the location you've chosen will be workable!! regardless of where you put it, it will still need more watering during your hottest months - most especially during the first two years. after that time, the root system should be fully developed and you should be able to lighten up on the amount of watering during the really hot periods.

    a tip on watering - especially when you first put it in the ground: water the root ball area directly and then do a thorough watering around the drip-line. the drip-line is the area right below the tips of the leaves.

    watering the drip-line will force the roots to grow outwards towards the moisture. doing it this way will help the palm (or any other plant) to become established more quickly.

    when i have a new transplant, i water the rootball area as well as the dripline for the first week. then i start giving the roots less water and focus more on the dripline. after a couple of weeks of that procedure, i just do the dripline - with an occassional short burst of water directly on the rootball area.

    being that your area is so much drier and hotter than mine, i'd say you should still water the rootball for at least 3-4 weeks before completely focusing on the dripline.

    please post some pics once you've got them planted!
     
  11. DZak

    DZak Member

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    Thanks so much for all the input!! I have a sprinkler system already in place (we are planting the palms in an area that has lawn) and from May to August we are allowed to water by automatic systems 3 times a day, for 4 minutes per cycle every day of the week. By hand, any length of time and number of times. Is this too much, not enough...??? I will definately be doing it by hand as you suggested after planting next week. March-April we can run the automatic system Monday, Wednesday, Friday (plus whatever hand watering we want to do).

    I see you are from Philadelphia. My husband is from Pittsburgh. He moved here in 1979...He says there was just one snow storm too many that year! :) I'm from the coast of California and figure everything just grows! Not so much here! Although I have had very good success so far with roses, lavendar and rosemary !

    I will keep everyone updated and will send pics when we get the palms planted.

    DZak
     
  12. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    the sprinkler system and plan for watering sounds okay. you can compensate plus/minus with the hand-watering so it should work out well. how close is the nearest sprayer to where you're going to plant?? hopefully not too near or too far so that the roots will have something to grow towards!

    if you hubby still has family in pittsburgh, then i'm sure he's rejoicing in NOT being there this winter!! my goodness! they've been hit with the snow something fierce this year...across state we've been lucky - only 2 storms that left any accumulation on the ground and neither one was more than 4 inches. i remember 79 - off from school with lots of snow days that year!

    take lots of pics as your planting!
     
  13. donaldjbaxter

    donaldjbaxter Member

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    I just losta Roebelenii last fall in florida and the nursery sais it was due to not enough water at the end of a hot summer with low rain fall ?
     
  14. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    during the first year (and sometimes the second) after you transplant any type of plant/bush/tree you really need to make sure it receives proper water so the roots can get established. that applies in every zone.

    you had a particularly dry summer last year, so watering frequently and thoroughly was even more important than it would be during 'normal' conditions. being that it's so hot there in the summer, everything needs to be monitored very closely to begin with - during extreme situations (drought) you need to be more vigilant.

    don, that's a shame it didn't transplant successfully!! any chance they'll replace it for you? was there a warranty?
     
  15. donaldjbaxter

    donaldjbaxter Member

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    Joclyn Thank you for the advice. I had to pay for the replacement and the day I brought home the forcast foe the next to mornings was frost. So I left in the pot and covered for two days .The third day temperatures went back up and I transplanted it.
     

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