Rhododendrons: Rhododendron seed collecting

Discussion in 'Ericaceae (rhododendrons, arbutus, etc.)' started by zakalls, Mar 8, 2003.

  1. zakalls

    zakalls Member

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    I have a question regarding rhodos, we have a rhodo nursary in Brackendale B.C we grow them all over our yard. 1/2 acre . my question to you is : Is is wrong to take seed from other rhodos ..say around Stanley park and other areas of Van or is it illegal?
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    In general, removal of plant material (including seeds) from any public park is illegal.

    Stanley Park is a municipal park of the City of Vancouver. According to the Vancouver Parks and Recreation Parks Control Bylaw:

    "No person shall cut, break, injure, remove or in any way destroy or damage any rock, soil, tree, shrub, plant, turf or flower..."

    While it doesn't specifically mention seed, I believe it would be argued successfully that removal of seed is against the spirit of the bylaw.

    At UBC Botanical Garden, removal of any plant material is strictly prohibited. Exceptions are made for research purposes when a material transfer agreement form has been signed by both the director and associate director.

    The best avenues for acquiring seed or cuttings in a non-commercial way are seed exchanges with like-minded plant enthusiasts or participation (and eventual exchanges!) in local gardening clubs or plant societies.
     
  3. zakalls

    zakalls Member

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    Thanks for your reply.. I didn't mean to call you David sorry.
     
  4. justjoan

    justjoan Member

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    Rhodo seed

    Perhaps you can tell me, how does one collect seed from
    Rhodo's and when would be the best time to do this?
     
  5. Chris Klapwijk

    Chris Klapwijk Active Member 10 Years

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    This article on the American Rhododendron Society website provides some general info on how rhodos may be grown from seed.
    Collect when ripe in fall.
    Hope this helps.
     
  6. fourd

    fourd Active Member 10 Years

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    And ARS also run a seed exchange. Seed from the wild is likely result in the same as the parents; however, and unless you are interested is species, I think this is a waste as the plants are somewhat inferior (small flowers, color, growth). The species you can buy tend to be beter specimens then wild. If interested in species, a rescue from the wild (new roads, development, etc) might be best bet if you want a species. Hybred are a beter bet as these are superior from the start; however, unless polination is controled, well, there is no guarentee of what you would get. Of course that can be the fun of it too. Many people that do seeds control polination so the parentage is known ... beats guessing later on. There is another problem growing from seed -- takes too long to get a flowering plant. All said, I find it enjoyable. One sugestion, is pick some off a neibors' plant (permission of course). But some pinch off the flowers after they bloom as that provides beter blooms next year...
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    As with roses and other popular groups, many hybrid rhododendron cultivars are comparatively limited and similar in their visual characteristics, relative to the wild species in the same genera. Flowerheads are often artificially large and formalized, the prettiness of species rhododendron tending to be lacking. Fragrance and interesting foliage traits (tomentum, indumentum, wrinkling etc.) are also less frequent (fragrance is actually a recessive trait).
     
  8. Chris Klapwijk

    Chris Klapwijk Active Member 10 Years

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    zakalls, would you per chance be living on the old Peter Evans property?
     
  9. fourd

    fourd Active Member 10 Years

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    Ron, that is so very true, and genetic! I have heard the himilian species are spectacular and in mayways superior in bloom to hybrids, but lack any hardiness. And the North American species I've seen (californian?, maximum, carolininum, catawbiense) are overall lackluster in bloom but very hardy. I actually like maximum's growth but it is lacking in flowers. However, cross them and, after I sure many trials, we get the hardy and full blooms we see in our hybrids. I think that was the goal of the early hybridnisers anyway. I believe our scented hybrids come from a couple of such parents (fortunni?, discolor, griffithianum)-- don't know if it is recessive of just a lack of scented species? I was gowing seeds from a lemon scented Cadis (was told it was a cadis but thinking griffithian cross? and ) and Van Ness sensation to see what came out -- but I digress. I think that is the same reason you don't see a lot of rhodies with heavy induentum. At one time, you they said you couldn't cross induentum with scales -- have they done that? what about crossing vireya species with garden varities? Vireya are some spectactular species!
     
  10. fourd

    fourd Active Member 10 Years

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    and please excuse my miss spelling -- yep, its true, I a tereable speller LOL!
     
  11. dunning

    dunning Member

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    Peter Cox says that a hybrid is two species "ruined". Frank Fujioka replies that hybrids are two (or more) species "improved". It appeals to my sense of humor to stir this controversy here. The truth is more complex - since even the first wild-collected seed generation in cultivation will show differences in response to the different selective forces that exist in gardens, as oppsed to those in the wild.

    No doubt there is a certain pleasure in helter-skelter mixing of the genetic palette, but I would object to the idea that species are inferior to hybrids. People interested in studying the interplay of natural phenomena will take an interest in the variations of the genus Rhododendron as it naturally occurs in an unmolested state. Those who wish to play God and manipulate the form of a living creature for their own pleasure will enjoy hybridizing.

    The commercial market, of course, validates the latter view.
     

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