Identification: Reddish orange cluster

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by swood02, Sep 1, 2012.

  1. swood02

    swood02 Member

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    We were wondering if someone can help us identify this large cluster of mushrooms. It is located beneath an oak tree in our yard in Frederick County, Maryland. It is about six inches high and about a foot across. It appeared suddenly a couple days ago.
     

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  2. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    This is not a species familiar to me, but I'm wondering if this might be Omphalotus?
    Happily, there are members of this forum from closer to your area who are likely to provide a better ID.
    cheers,
    frog
     
  3. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Looks like Omphalotus to me!
     
  4. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    That is Definitely the Jack'O'Lantern Mushroom. Known to glow in the dark! an amazing fungi. The look alike (regarding the under gills continueing down the stem) to the chanterelle.

    Beautiful photos!
     
  5. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Neat!
    Do they all always glow? As in, do you need to find fresh specimens in order to see the glow?
    Would they still glow after being picked?
    Mycelia glow too?

    -frog
     
  6. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    pick some fresh mushrooms, put them in a brown bag. that evening, go in a dark room and let your eyes adjust to the darkness for 5 minutes. then, open the bag and watch it glow.
     
  7. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    We don't seem to have Omphalotus in the Pacific Northwest, but we have Armillarias and some Mycenas reputed to glow: Haven't caught them glowing yet, but will try again this season, use the paper bag!

    -frog
     
  8. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    I would beg to dissagree with that statement Frog.

    I have found the omphatolas or Jack'O'Lantern growning in the woods while picking chanterelles on Vancouver Island. I would agree that in 6 years picking on the island I only found a couple patches and that was during the same season.
     
  9. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi Joel,

    I would be very excited to find that! Although I've not heard of an Omphalotus find in this region before, I figure that fungi have their own minds and you never know what will turn up where eh.
    If you run into it again this season, please do post a photo if possible.

    The only critter I've found in PNW so far that looks something like that is Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca (on wood), at least when a bit dry, as the wetter ones usually show a greater colour difference between gills and cap.

    cheers!
    frog
     
  10. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca

    I stand completely corrected. This is most definitely the mushroom that I came across and not the Jack'
    Though they were growning in clusters, patches.

    I love this site. Correction is good for us.

    -Joel
     

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