"Red Sister" Question

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by julaubu, Oct 11, 2006.

  1. julaubu

    julaubu Member

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    I just joined site, and I was reading the question that Brandi has regarding her plant. I just purchased a "red sister" plant, and there are some brown edges on the leaves, but my biggest concern in that there appears to be millipedes living in the soil. I have seen at least 4 of them. I was wondering if anyone knows if this should pose a threat to the plant, and if there is any safe way to gret rid of them. I am not a very experienced gardner, yet. So, I apprecaite any expert advice. Thank you!
     
  2. James D.

    James D. Active Member

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    The millipedes will eat the fine root hairs and will lay eggs and then those larva will eat the roots, so yes it does pose a problem. The best way to get rid of any soil insect is to buy some horticultural oil concentrate, can be found at any home repair store and even wal-mart, mix some in a bucket and then plunge the rootball into the solution for about 10-15 seconds then pull the plant out and let the excess drain. This will kill the bugs and larva, but it should be repeated in about 2 weeks time to kill the newly hatched insects. And once the plant has been dipped do not place it in full sun because it may get some burning ( browning) on the leaves due to the oil in the soil. that should help kill the millipedes in your plant soil, it also works for root mealy bug and fungas gnats. Hope this helps
     
  3. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Millipedes are neither insects, nor generally pests (only when in large numbers).

    [WIKI]Millipede[/WIKI] on Wikipedia

    From the Millipede and Centipede Management Guide from UC Davis

     

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