Re:Transplanting holly seedlings...

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by Derek Chalcraft, Jul 11, 2005.

  1. Derek Chalcraft

    Derek Chalcraft Member

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    Hello,
    I have a great many self-seeded common holly seedlings, 10-12 inches in height. I want to transplant them to form, what I hope will prove to be an effective hedge against the dogs which use our lawn as a latrine.
    Question: when is the best time of year to transplant? Normally I would assume it to be in the fall, but I have a vague recollection of having been told the summer is actually the best time to transplant holly.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: Transplanting holly seedlings...

    Since common holly is a pest species here - as indicated by the seedlings you got - it would be better if you chose another kind of plant. If still determined to proceed, try winter.

    Visit a woodland or other site with the infernal things all over the place and you will see what I mean.
     
  3. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    Re: Transplanting holly seedlings...

    In Raleigh, NC, Late February or early March is the best time to move Holly. That's just before they start new growth. Give them adequate of water through the first summer.

    If you think Hollies are a pest, try Oaks. The Holly seedlings are easily pulled, but the Oaks are tenacious.
    In spite of having many Holly trees, there are relatively few seedlings compared to the thousands of acorns that fall from a couple of Oak trees and root by the hundreds.

    Maybe that's why Raleigh is called the "City of Oaks" instead of "The City of Holly".
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: Transplanting holly seedlings...

    Transplanting just before new top growth starts is a less desirable time, precisely because new top growth is just about to start! (And summer heat and drought is on the horizon). Autumn is better, USDA 6 and warmer.
     
  5. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    Re: Transplanting holly seedlings...

    Never had a problem with Febuary or early March transplanting in zone 7. There's 2 months for them to establish roots before the top growth starts.

    Planting in the fall has resulted in winter damage.

    If you can pick the males, there won't be any exteraneous seeding to contend with.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: Transplanting holly seedlings...

    Most root elongation occurs in fall. "Fall" in this instance is when the terminal buds are set and a chemical signal is sent to the roots to elongate. On some trees this could be as early as July or August. In spring plants are depleted by living through the winter on their stored nutrients, like hibernating animals, and soils are cold and wet. Root activity is comparatively limited.

    If you transplant late, do not get good rootballs or a cold front blows in early, of course there is going to be some winter damage.

    Male hollies fertilize female hollies, if any females are in the vicinity planting males only will not curb reproduction.
     
  7. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    Re: Transplanting holly seedlings...

    It will in your planting. Other places, where the females are, will have most of the seedlings except those returned to your yard by birds.

    It is interesting that in a study of Cryptomeria japonica 'Yoshino' propagation done at N.C. State University, it was found that maximum yield occured with cuttings taken in February. Since cuttings have no roots, it would be logical to expect better results in the Fall, but generalizations based on theoretical plant behavior are often not the whole story.
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: Transplanting holly seedlings...

    Yes: cuttings have no roots. We're talking about transplants. And best timing for maximum rooting of same item varies from year-to-year.

    My generalizations are based on actual plant behavior, common environmetal factors. If you're interested in these kinds of things, start by looking at books by Carl Whitcomb at a college library. Also try Linda Chalker-Scott's web site.
     
  9. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    Re: Transplanting holly seedlings...

    Been there, done that.
     

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