Raspberry

Discussion in 'Fruit and Vegetable Gardening' started by Durgan, Oct 3, 2009.

  1. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    Raspberry

    http://www.durgan.org/URL/?LZBGU 3 October 2009 Raspberry

    These late season raspberries are good quality. It has been wet and cold so they were a bit late ripening. This is the first quantity picking this season.
     
  2. JanR

    JanR Active Member

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    Hi Durgan. It looks like you have a great crop of raspberries. I planted four rasperry plants this summer and they have a really good crop of rasperries on them now. I'm not sure if I will get to eat them or not as frost is threatening every day. :( Was it you, that, that cuts the plants down to the ground in the fall?
     
  3. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    I have cut to the ground in the Fall, but then one only gets a Fall crop the following year. This is the lazy method, and sometimes necessary if very crowded.

    This year only the canes that bore fruit will be cut out, and two crops will be produced next year.
     
  4. Dana09

    Dana09 Active Member

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    This point about cutting them back is confusing me!

    In the old days, a raspberry was considered a biennial where all new shoots are left to grow and all fruited canes are removed, leaving the new shoots to fruit the next year. So I read when I had hundreds of them 30 yrs ago and so I treated them with great success when I moved into a place in Delta where a Japanese fishing family had settled in the 50's on the south bank of the Fraser, on one of the many River Roads there. Beautiful, endless, good delta soil there, now buried for industry.

    Now I see where a neighbour always cuts hers back to the ground, all of it!
    Her's are an ever-bearing variety where I used to grow an old fashioned shorter season variety - is that the difference?

    Also,
    I have found raspberries to be very rewarding to grow in pots as they are cold tolerant and absolutely hate to have wet feet which a pot disallows. The raspberries fruit very nicely in the pots, something many plants won't do to any standard of quality in the fruit.

    Any ideas on the differences between the plants and the cutting of them?

    D
     
  5. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    You got it right, according to the literature.

    My so called overbearing were cut to the ground last Fall and I never got any fruit this year. I wont touch the new growth, which is extensive, this Fall and see what happens in 2010. Anyway, I should be confident as to the procedure if I get berries in 2010.

    The ones producing now have been cut back to ground level the last two years and always produce a Fall crop the following year as mentioned in a previous post. Only this years fruiting canes will be removed this Fall, and I expect two crops one in the Summer and one in the Fall.
     
  6. Dana09

    Dana09 Active Member

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    Oh, Thanks Durgan,
    You had already explained but I missed it the first time.
    A big DDuuhh moment.

    D
     
  7. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Durgan, to clarify your statement, I assume that you are going to remove only part of this year's canes. If you remove all of this year's fruiting canes from your everbearing raspberries, you will only get a Fall crop. To get the early crop, you have to leave the lower part of the canes that fruited this Fall. They will fruit from new branches that develop next Spring below the fruiting part of this year's canes. You should prune off the ends of the canes (where the berries were produced - the ends will die after fruiting), but you have to leave the rest of the canes for the early crop. The new canes that develop in the Spring will only bear a Fall crop.
     
  8. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    Sounds good and quite easy to accomplish.
    For example:
    I was assuming that the early crop in 2010 is produced on the growth that took place in 2009, but produced no berries, and the new canes that start in 2010 would produce the Fall crop.

    From your comments it is the same canes that produced the Fall crop in 2009, if the tops are clipped, that will produce the early 2010 crop.

    Further all that vegetative growth of 2009 is not canes, thus does not produce berries. If I am interpreting correctly.
     
  9. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    http://www.durgan.org/URL/?ZXSDN 6 October 2009 Raspberries
    Another picking. Ladybugs are prevalent amongst the fruit, and there are one of two wasps eating the berries.
     
  10. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Durgan, your statement "Further all that vegetative growth of 2009 is not canes, thus does not produce berries." leaves me a bit confused. Since you removed all canes from last year, all of your current growth should be from 2009 and these canes should all be producing a Fall crop, which seems to be the case from your photos. You may have a few late-developing canes that didn't have time to mature and are still green. It's undoubtedly too late for them to develop flowers and fruit; they should probably be pruned out. It's a good idea to prune out all of the smaller and weaker canes to allow more space for the strong canes. All 2009 canes that you leave will bear an early crop in 2010, and all mature 2010 canes will bear a Fall crop in 2010.
     
  11. Dana09

    Dana09 Active Member

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    Oh, a quick tid-bit of raspberry lore that the mention of ladybugs on them brought back.
    Apparently the wild sort carry a grub that is a gourmet delight to fish! A friend's uncle used to pay for them when the kids went berry picking.
     
  12. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    Will raspberries produce true from seed?


    : )
     
  13. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    This Fall this is my intention, probably within the next two weeks.

    Trim the ever bearing tops to a reasonable height. These plants produced no fruit in 2009 and were cut to the ground in the Fall of 2008.

    The ones in the pictures I will trim the fruiting cane to just below the bearing tops. I should get two crops in 2010. These plants were cut to the ground in the Fall of 2008. Comment please.
     
  14. Corine

    Corine Member

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    What is the variety called? And where can I buy seedlings?
    Thanks!
    C
     
  15. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    The seedlings are usually packed and sold in the Spring. Most suppliers of garden plants sell the plants. Mine were purchased at Home Depot, and one group was given to me from another garden. I have no idea of the names, except the Home Depot type were marked ever bearing.
     
  16. Dana09

    Dana09 Active Member

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    Raspberry plans have sure gotten expensive around here lately.
    I recently bought a few very reasonably priced at the community garden which is moving. At one local store they had individual plants being sold in 1 gal. pots for $15.00 !
    Yes, as Durgan says it is best to buy them in spring in the bundles that are sold then.

    D
     
  17. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    I am still wondering, does anyone know if they grow true from seed? Want to know if the seeds I have are worth sowing...


    : )
     
  18. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Hollyberry Lady, Raspberries, as far as I know, are never grown from seed, unless you are trying to develop a new variety. Since they are so easy to clone, there seems to be little reason to grow them from seed. My raspberries are always trying to spread beyond the area I want them in; so I weed out dozens of young plants every year.

    Durgan, I suspect that you have both everbearing and June-bearing raspberries. June-bearing raspberry canes produce one crop, typically around June, the year after the canes sprouted from their roots. Everbearing canes produce two crops: the first in the Fall of the year they sprouted and the second in June of the following year. If you have any mature canes that didn't produce fruit this year, they must be June-bearing raspberries that will fruit next year.
     
  19. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    I just like to experiment is all, and plus I grow mostly everything from seed - more rewarding and fun. Just didn't know if they would still produce fruits when grown from seed. Hopefully I can get them to germinate...


    : )
     
  20. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    I was slowly beginning to suspect that I had the two types reversed. I was relying on the label from Home Depot when purchased. Thank you much. I now have the pruning business sorted out. I probably would have got there in about two or three years by observation and experiment.
     
  21. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    http://www.durgan.org/URL/?GMCDX 10 October 2009 Raspberries
    More berries picked. Quality is still excellent. It has been cold so quantity is a bit reduced.
     
  22. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    Um...Durgan...where did you say you lived?!!!


    : O


    Those look incredible!


    : )
     
  23. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    Brantford, ON. The best growing area that I have lived in. Reasonable rain during the Summer, about 120 or so frost free days. Everybody else grow grass, so don't have an excess of bugs. Large area about 0.4 of an acre with no large trees so have full sun on most of the garden. Soil is deep quality clay which has good surface drainage, and it now is highly modified by compost and sand. My only obstacle, over which there is little control, is the weather. What more can one ask for?
     
  24. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    By the look of those raspberries, you definitely know what you're doing, Durgan! Wow, those look delicious.

    Just a wise crack about where you live - I knew you were in Brantford. I was gonna come and gobble all those up for ya!

    Raspberries are my favorite, and you sure grow them fabulously.


    : )
     

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