Question for photopro or any others.

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by riptidefrog, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    You should be aware this species grows quite well in low light. However, it always grows larger leaves as it climbs and reaches higher light levels. If you want to speed up the growth process, I would consider moving the exeriment to brighter light. However, an area near a window is often quite adequate.
     
  2. riptidefrog

    riptidefrog Active Member

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    Well its been a while since the experiment started and here are the results. The water appears to flow both ways along the xylem. Both groups of cuttings are doing well and show no evidence of wilting.
     
  3. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    That is what all the experts I traded mail with seemed to expect. It appears a few groups of aroids (likely not all) have that ability.
     
  4. edleigh7

    edleigh7 Well-Known Member

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    Interesting, thanks for the info...

    Ed
     
  5. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Just wanted to say - you can do this on any thread by clicking on Thread Tools (upper navbar, righthand side) -> Subscribe to this Thread
     
  6. riptidefrog

    riptidefrog Active Member

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    I have news.

    It has been a while since the experiment was started and both groups of cuttings (the upside down and right side up) are doing equally well. Neither is showing any signs of leaf drop or yellowing or anything else that i can see as stress to the cuttings.

    The only thing interesting going on right now is that the upside down cuttings are sendig out new shoots from the bottom of the cutting at nodes below the waterline. The right side up cuttings are sending up new shoots from the top like what is usually seen.

    Just thought this was interesting and you may all like to hear this news.
     
  7. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    It would appear you have made a discovery! The plant seems to know "which end is up" but is capable of working around the problem and still produces new growth. Keep good notes, as I suspect you are, and make sure you approach that teacher for credit for your work!
     
  8. riptidefrog

    riptidefrog Active Member

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    Ah credit for the work!

    That would be awesome but i suspect that the professors would feel that this experiment is too informal for it to be considered for credit. In addition to this i am in the nursing program and i doubt they would really view this as anything more than dalliance with my hobby.

    it would be nice though. I may end up going back to school for something plant related once i have my career underway.

    If anything changes i'll keep this thread posted.
     
  9. riptidefrog

    riptidefrog Active Member

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    I have come to the conclusion that this may be the way i root cuttings of pothos in the future. Normally when rooted the normal wa these plants have a somewhat unsightly stem segment sticking up above the bewly forming branch that never looke great unless it is buried in dirt.

    With the upside down rooting method the new growth is healthy and my assumption would be that the upside down plant can be cut off at a later date leaving a plant that will look more natural and have more underground nodes once the plant is trimmed and planted in soil. Therefore when pruning at later date a cut can be made closer to the soil line because there are so many nodes below the surface. then when the new vines form they wil look more natural than most of the cutting of this plant i have taken in the past.

    Im bad at explaining thigs so if this post needs clarification let me know.
     
  10. edleigh7

    edleigh7 Well-Known Member

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    Your assumption sounds right to me anyway!!

    Ed
     

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