Question about Camelia

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by Lara, Mar 22, 2007.

  1. Lara

    Lara Active Member

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    Hi, are there different types of camelia: indoor/outdoor?
    I live in Montreal. Can someone suggest a place or internet source to buy potted camelias? I need a plant that I can keep indoors.
    Thanks
     
  2. James D.

    James D. Active Member

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    I cannot suggest a site but if your looking for one to survive indoors try camelia japonica
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    In Montreal they would all be indoor plants. Camellias are excellent for growing in cool conservatories and similar setups. Would not be expected to be so good inside an ordinary room, too dark and dry.
     
  4. Lara

    Lara Active Member

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    Hi James D. and Ron B,
    thanks for answering. I will definitely look for camelia japonica. I found place in Montreal area for different types of plants. The sales person said that they may receive hardy camelias that will be able to tolerate winter. I was surprised that it is possible. I believe this plant will not survive outside during our winter. I would never leave it in my garden for a winter, in my opinion camelia like a hibiscus suppose to be in warm conditions.
    When I asked if there are outdoor/indoor types of camelia I meant if there are camelia that will tolerate indoor conditions: dry air, and so on. I was not sure if this plant will be able to live inside during the winter.
    Lara
     
  5. Lara

    Lara Active Member

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    Hi, is there a camelia society in Canada?
    Thanks
     
  6. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    A conservatory is fine but artificial heating would not make for a happy chappy.

    Camellias do best in cool climates. As far as I know they are foothill plants and I think are a member ot the tea family.

    We have a few here that seem to tolerate full sun and make great hedges. They also cope well with dry conditions. Thick glossy green leaves.

    Could you have it as a potted plant that can be moved with the seasons.

    http://www.hortic.com/ics/camellia-origin

    Liz
     
  7. smivies

    smivies Active Member

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    The hardiest Camellias currently available would probably survive a zone 6a (-23ºC for Liz) with protection....zone 7a (-18ºC) without protection. Check out the Camellia Forest Nursery

    As for ideal Camellia climates. They are native to the hot humid subtropical and warm temperate areas of Asia. They thrive in climates with high humidity & consistent year around rain. That's why they do so well in Japan, Sri Lanka, China, India, Southeast US, and I guess anywhere else with a similar climate.

    Simon
     
  8. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Oh Simon I wish for the occasional -23C. We are lucky if we go below 5C here in winter. However 40+C is definatly the go for summer :) Hence my comment about some Camellia used here out in hot sun as hedges. I am lucky I live in the hills and we have that lovely red volcanic soil and Rhodos, Camelia and Azaleas are common garden variety around here. Even have the local Tourist Rhododendrom gardens.
    Liz

    http://www.totaltravel.com.au/travel/vic/yarravalleyvic/dandanongs/directory/gardens
     
  9. DandyLioness

    DandyLioness Active Member

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    Too bad you weren't close enough to dig up mine. I'm getting rid of mine this year.
     
  10. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    I've found them quite hard to transplant.
     
  11. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    When I was growing up my father grew them commercialy in long rows. He also put many into the garden to get big. {later used in landscaping new gardens]The way he transplanted them was to have a good root ball and then either tie up in a hessian wrap with bail twine for transport or if they had to be replanted just put into another location with a hole wider than the rootball and deep enough to have it level with the top of the soil again. Watered in very well, staked and were usually fed with bone meal (blood and bone) and mulched. After our bad bushfires I know when they were renovating some of the big old gardens stuff was being replanted and moved all over the place with great success. I think the trick was to keep the rootball and that can be very difficult with some soils.

    Liz
     
  12. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The sparse, wiry roots of established camellias have seemed to be too much of a challenge for me when I have tried to move them. Another failure was established star magnolias, have also killed Oregon grape a few times. Latter two kinds definitely didn't come away with enough roots. All others, no problem.
     
  13. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I think the reason for good luck with transplanting is the soil we have. It is very difficult to kill anything. It is the basalt based volcanic soil. Usually bright red to deep brown and gets better the more compost and manures are added. It holds water but does not bog up like clay. It will dry out hence the big thing with mulch. We are also trying to garden water wise here in Australia given our huge water shortages. So many areas drought declared and on very strict water restrictions that means NO garden watering except tank or grey water. There is a huge push on to get water tanks back as part of the landscape. Common years ago but were slowly outlawed by councils as town water was connected. BIG mistake.
    Liz
     
  14. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    So gardening there became a tankless task?
     
  15. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    It's getting that way :) But I tell you what it really makes you think how one gets a good garden without the water on tap so to speak. Is there a list or letters about dry gardening on this web site??

    liz
     
  16. harmony372

    harmony372 Member

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    Hi, Lara! I also live in Montreal and I've fallen in love with Camellia during a recent trip to Greece. I would like to know where in Montreal I could buy Camellia from. Could you, please let me know.
    Thank you & I really appreciate your reply.
     
  17. Lara

    Lara Active Member

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    Hi harmony372,
    I got mine from US. I don't know where in Montreal you can buy one...I saw a very small Camelia plant at Canadian Tire plants sale during a summer. I wanted to buy it, but it was in very bad condition, plus trips were all over the plant.
    Sorry, unfortunately I can't help you, but if my plant will grow bigger I can share with you some cuttings.
     
  18. victor

    victor Member

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    Hello it is interesting. I'm looking for camellia in Montreal. Can you tell me where can I find some japonica varieties.
    Victor
     
  19. harmony372

    harmony372 Member

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    Hi, Lara! Thank you for your reply. I hope your plant is doing great. I meant to look for a camellia in the US; however, knowing that it was illegal to bring plants into Canada, I gave up. Perhaps we are allowed to bring from the US, aren't we? Next time I go to the US I'll take a chance. Do you think the plant will be able to grow roots from cuttings?
    Thank you,
    Ramona
     
  20. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  21. harmony372

    harmony372 Member

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    Thank you, Daniel. Good idea to contact CFIA. This is what I'm going to do.
    Have a good day!
    Ramona
     
  22. Trueblue

    Trueblue Member

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    Camelia in Montreal

    Hi,

    If you still haven't found a Camelia.

    Try Flora Exotica.
    They are Montreal-based.

    Email Perry, the owner, and he will let you know if he has it in stock or not and when.

    I recommend you go there and select your plant.

    Here is the direct link to their site:
    http://www.floraexotica.ca/Flower-Camellia.htm

    Good luck!
     

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