Identification: QE Park : Hypholoma capnoides - Conifer Tuft ?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by David Tang, Dec 1, 2018.

  1. David Tang

    David Tang Active Member

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    Found by David Wong. Only one in the patch.
    Kindly confirm if ID is correct please. Thank you.
     

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  2. Frog

    Frog Well-Known Member Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi David - assuming these were growing on wood, yes they do look like Hypholoma capnoides. The gill shot shows a faint yellow cast but that could be reflection, not sure.
    I mention that because the very similar looking Hypholoma fasciculare has a sulfur yellow tone to it ... more clearly seen in person than photo sometimes.

    FYI - Also, a tiny taste (and spit out) between the two species reveals mild taste for the former and intensely bitter for the latter. Which assumes the ability to taste bitter which a percentage of the population does not.
     
  3. David Tang

    David Tang Active Member

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    Haha, count me out !
    It seems my taste buds are deteriorating with age.
    When all around the dining table say it's OK, I still need add a bit of salt.
     
  4. Frog

    Frog Well-Known Member Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    <grin> Yup, tasting mushrooms is not something everyone is keen on ... but I do have to say it is one of the identification tools for some species.

    ...um ... at least of mushrooms ... I don't think we identify (ornithological point of view) any bird species by taste for example :-)
     
  5. David Tang

    David Tang Active Member

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    We eat them and taste the whole of the birds. except the bone & feathers.
     

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