Hedges: Pyramid vs. emerald cedars in zone 6?

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by ChristineP, Apr 8, 2011.

  1. ChristineP

    ChristineP Member

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    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    Hello,

    I am wondering if anyone can give me an idea of how high I can expect a hedge of pyramid cedars to grow in zone 6 (Toronto area). I have been looking online but different sites put the height anywhere between 10'-20'.

    Also: are they taller than emerald cedars, or do they both grow to approx. the same height? One of the garden centres near me said that they grow to about the same height, but I thought emeralds were shorter.

    Lastly: can you suggest any other tall, narrow hedging trees that are fairly inexpensive and fast-growing? I have been researching it online but most other options are either slow-growing or quite expensive.

    Thanks,
    Christine
     
  2. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Metro Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Pyramid generally grow a bit quicker, around here a foot or so a year while the smaragd grows about 8 to 10 inches. With controlled irrigation and heavy fertilizer that rate can be increased. Overall height I would say in the range of 20 feet, although both can grow higher it takes a fair while to do so. Snow loading can be a problem on both though, if that might be a concern in your locale.
     
  3. ChristineP

    ChristineP Member

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    Thank you very much, this is helpful.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 10, 2011
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Many years ago, driving past a grower's field that had larger specimens of both cultivars I noticed they were all the same height. 'Smaragd' has become ubiquitous at outlets here, one of the most common outdoor plant offerings. 'Fastigiata' has become pretty much replaced by it.
     

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