Pyracantha Mohave as a stand alone hedge?

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by lily, Oct 1, 2009.

  1. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    366
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Abbotsford, British Columbia
    Can it be grown with using a trellis or a wall to climb? I thought it might look nice as a hedge. Thank you.
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,030
    Likes Received:
    285
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Yes, no problem.
     
  3. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    366
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Abbotsford, British Columbia
    Sorry Michael, I should have proofread what I had written before I clicked on the 'submit button' ~ I meant to ask if I could grow this into a hedge 'without' using a wall or trellis. Also, I would like to know if it is really thorny?
    Thanks again for your help. Much appreciated.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,030
    Likes Received:
    285
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    That's what I understood you wanted, from the thread title! Yes, it will grow without support, though may need pruning to keep it from getting broader than high. Yes, it is very thorny . . . not called firethorn for nothing!
     
  5. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    366
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Abbotsford, British Columbia
    Thank you very much Michael.
     
  6. kaspian

    kaspian Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    459
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maine coast, USA, zone 5
    I don't know this particular variety, but I'm using Pyracantha 'Gnome' as part of an informal hedge and it works very well. It does tend to sprawl a bit without support, but I've tried to allow plenty of space for that, and the occasional pruning gives you a chance to root cuttings (which is nearly as easy as rooting ivy) to make more plants for filling in gaps.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,625
    Likes Received:
    510
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Stiff and sharp firethorns are generally scab-susceptible in this climate, even the naturalized P. coccinea has this problem here. Frost injury can also be significant in hard winters. Even when choosing a superior named selection and having it remain always clean and undamaged - if that is a likely consistent outcome - the gardener still has to not be bothered by the smell of the flowers.

    'Teton' produces a nice shape with pretty small leaves and berries. But I don't see it in local outlets anymore.

    On a small place like yours I would think in terms of small groupings of as many different kinds of shrubs as possible instead of large groupings of a small number of kinds.
     
  8. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    366
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Abbotsford, British Columbia
    I think they are really pretty. I would like to make a dense hedge in a 20'ft long planting area. How far apart should I plant them? I plan to keep them from getting real tall and spindly. Thanks again and I will wear long gloves when trimming/pruning.
     
  9. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,030
    Likes Received:
    285
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Does the implied converse, that floppy and blunt firethorns are not susceptible, apply?
     
  10. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    366
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Abbotsford, British Columbia
    Can someone please tell me how far apart I should plant Pyracantha Mohave? I want to create a dense hedge about 15 ft long. Thank you.
    PS. Ron..I did a bit of researching and apparently the Pyracantha 'Mohave' is scab resistant. That was good news to hear.
     
  11. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,030
    Likes Received:
    285
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Put them as close as you like; the closer, the more quickly the plants will interlace to make a continuous hedge. So buy as many as you feel you can afford.
     
  12. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    366
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Abbotsford, British Columbia
    Hi Michael,
    Thanks so much for your help. I have (3) in there now spaced at about 5' apart. I'll get a few more. Once established, can I just shear them into a nice neat hedge in the spring?
     
  13. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Anacortes, Washington, USA
    Lilly,
    An excellent animal & child repellent hedge. They may try to run thru it, but usually only once! Then in the late fall after the berries ripen and begin to ferment it is a hoot to watch the robins and other birds eat the fermenting berries, get drunk and wobble all over the place. They had to quit planting it in the freeway dividers in California because the birds where a real hazzard to traffic. lol ;)))) barb
     
  14. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    366
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Abbotsford, British Columbia
    Hi Barbara, thanks for your post. Oh thank goodness, there are no small children or pets around my area. I live in a 55+ mobile park in a rural area. There are definitely lots of small birds around here, black birds, robins, chickadees etc. I'm sure it will be fun to watch them around the berries.
     
  15. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Anacortes, Washington, USA
    Lily,
    Pyracantha can be espaliered so pruning is not a problem. Instead of shearing it into a formal square sided hedge, try to just clip the growth that over extends the general shape you want. So many times after a while the hedge becomes a shell with leaves just at the ends of the branches that get the light and they are hollow inside. This does make a great place for the birds to nest or hide from Hawks and other preditors, but not the greatest, lasting hedge. Try to prune it so it lets some light into the interior. Just an idea. Happy inebriated bird watching! barb
     
  16. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,625
    Likes Received:
    510
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    I have seen 'Mohave' quite blackened by scab. Have you smelled a firethorn bush in flower? I would be sure you were acquainted with this odor before installing many of these on your property.
     
  17. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    366
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Abbotsford, British Columbia
    Ron, well, I did plant the pyracantha mohave. If the flowers smell really bad, I'll simply get rid of it. What does it smell like?
    Barbara, thanks for the pruning tips. Do you have pyracantha? Does it smell bad to you too? Maybe I made a mistake planting this. hmmm
     
  18. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Anacortes, Washington, USA
    Lily,
    I've had several kinds of pyracantha over the years, and really never notice the smell. One was a hedge. One was P. Santa Cruze to keep a bank from sliding, and now it's the little crawly one that someone else planted in the rockery. I keep trying to pull it out and it just keeps popping up elsewhere.

    Even if it ends up with leaves and berries on just the outside and twigs inside - it is still a GREAT bird hide-a-way from preditor birds. The hedge outside my Vets Office is like a "whack-a-mole", @ a carnival, with birds poping in and out and making all sort of birdy noises. Great to watch and to listen to!! ;)) barb
     
  19. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,030
    Likes Received:
    285
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    I've never noticed the smell as being particularly obnoxious. Fairly similar to hawthorn.
     
  20. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,032
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    North Vancouver, B.C., Canada
    If not Pyracantha, try Berberis... most effective hedge and equally lethal!
     
  21. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,625
    Likes Received:
    510
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Darwin barberry is one of the most admired flowering shrubs but burns below about 10 degrees F.
     

Share This Page