Identification: Purple caps?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by C.Wick, May 1, 2009.

  1. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    These small mycena-looking mushrooms are right now living on a woodchip pile at the very edge in a shady area. The wood is mixed...so can't say specifically what kind.
    Very nice and damp, humidity is great in this location.
    They've a strong whitish stem, gray gills, black spore print, and the young have the very wispy veil that is gone before they're fully grown.
    They've a sweet scent to them? Almost fruity...hard to explain.
    NE Kansas
    Other kinds growing in the immediate area are cups (possibly Peziza vesiculosa), Eyelash cups, lots of Coprinus sp. and a couple other UNK's.
     

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  2. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi C.Wick,
    I don't know the answer, but have you investigated Stropharia as a possibility?
    frog
     
  3. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    I have...unfortunately as this mushroom ages it turns a brown color? So I think that is causing me a lot of difficulty with the ID.
    I'm finding more and more patches of them and all seem consistant with wood chips.
     
  4. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Is the spore print black or could it be a very deep purple or purple/brown?
     
  5. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    A definately pure black! I was looking where I had lighter 'dustings' of the spore and when I rub it into the paper it still looks black?
     
  6. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Is the stipe hollow?
     
  7. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    No. Was very thin and fiberous. Broke easily but would leave 'hairs' attached so not a clean break.
     
  8. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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  9. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    lol...I'll go with the 'snaperilla'....they definately were delicate stems. These are a very 'dainty' little mushroom though..........the link and names so far all seem more robust looking then these are?
     
  10. Stilbella

    Stilbella Active Member

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    I'm thinking Stropharia Rugoso-annulata, maybe? Purple cap, annulus, grayish gills, black spores...
     
  11. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    THOSE are beautiful.....the stems however on mine are very thin and delicate? And STILL growing every now and then in little pop-up areas. The thickest was maybe 2cm thick? Also, the ring is vevy faint, disappearing once the cap is fully extended. I only found the 'babies' with the connecting fibers.
     
  12. fish dr

    fish dr Active Member

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    Can't be Stropharia Rugosa Annulata, AKA King Stropharia. They are most famous for being large, and when mature their caps form a dish upward. The I have them in culture right now.

    I've seen those in the picture before, but really have no idea what they are. I am only curious about fungi that are big enough and available in sufficient quantity to be edible.

    They say "The way to a man's heart is through his stomach" and those, being so small, have no place in my heart.

    If I had to guess, I would have to say a psilocybin-containing type, which , of course was once called a stropharia.
     

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