Identification: Prunus padus - tiny white blossoms in racemes

Discussion in 'Ornamental Cherries' started by wcutler, May 15, 2010.

  1. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    My bad - I started talking about Prunus padus in the One for the cherry scouts - Pendula, white blossoms thread that began with a Prunus pendula. I've moved all that conversation to this new thread.

    I see that [Glasnevin Botanic Gardens in Ireland] have Prunus padus 'Watereri' (link goes to map -C6, location 7), a cultivar that has been awarded a Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit. I saw such a nice Prunus padus in Bath that when I read about 'Watereri', I wondered if the Bath one might have been that. I'd love to see a photo of that... .
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2010
  2. Douglas Justice

    Douglas Justice Active Member UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society 10 Years

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    Re: One for the cherry scouts

    I believe this is Prunus padus 'Watereri'. Photo taken in the Temple (Inns at Court) precinct in the City of London taken last Wednesday.
     

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  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: One for the cherry scouts

    The Woody Plant Collection in the Washington Park Arboretum (1994, University of Washington, Seattle) lists Prunus padus 'Dropmore':

    "Very free-flowering with 4"-5" long flower clusters"*

    Trees of Seattle - Second Edition (2006, Arthur Lee Jacobson, Seattle) gives a street location for P. padus 'Spaethii':

    "Flowers larger (ca. 3/4" wide) than those of typical P. Padus"

    From what I saw of the Seattle street tree planting the flowering aspect may have been pretty similar to that produced by P. padus 'Watereri' - although perhaps never as dense as in D. Justice photo (above). Certainly they appeared to be larger-parted than normal. According to Jacobson (2006) one of these was measured as being 44' tall. By now nearly all of the planting, which dates from the 1970s may have been removed. Probably a few examples are still present, but I have not visited the site this year.

    *Floral descriptions from A.L. Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees (1996, Ten Speed Press, Berkeley)
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Here's the tree I thought might be 'Watereri', in the Parade Garden in Bath, from May 5. The London tree is much more densely covered in blossoms. I guess I wouldn't have been as excited by this one if I'd seen that one first.
     

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  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Agree.
    Also, yes.

    I've seen speculation, which seems very well-founded, that 'Watereri' is a hybrid between Prunus padus and Prunus serotina. It certainly isn't much like typical wild Prunus padus.

    Here's a wild specimen of true Prunus padus; Northumberland, UK.
     

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  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The Bath picture shows the same general character as I remember the P. padus 'Spaethii' in the Seattle street planting having. To compare your pictures with any specimens that may now be remaining there (by 2006 many had been removed) I would have to drive down to south Seattle and back. Today there is activity in the vicinity that will probably back the freeway up quite a bit.
     
  7. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Thanks for the thought, Ron. They might not even still be in bloom around here - England was several weeks behind us.

    I don't know where Old-House Interiors Magazine gets its information, but it says:
    [FONT=arial, helvetica, verdana][FONT=arial, helvetica, verdana]. [/FONT][/FONT]
     
  8. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    And then there's P. padus 'Colorata', which we saw at Great Dixter Gardens in east Sussex, UK (and somewhere else too, but I've lost track of where).
     

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  9. Vdunne1952

    Vdunne1952 Active Member

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    Hi folks,
    I have photos of the trees in Glasnevin but it seems to me to be totally wrong. Also P. padus 'Pandora' from a garden in Navan, Co. Meath [edited by wcutler 20100521: P. padus 'Pandora' photos are in the next posting]. See what you think.
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 21, 2010
  10. Vdunne1952

    Vdunne1952 Active Member

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    Here are the second lot of photos:
    Previous post:
    1. The tree labeled as P. 'Okumiyako'
    2. The label on that tree (see flower in background)
    3 The flower on that tree.

    This post:
    1. The flowers of P. padus 'Watereri' (also Glasnevin)
    2. Prunus padus 'Pandora' or 'Colorata' in Navan, Co. Meath
    3. The flower of 'Pandora' or 'Colorata'

    Enjoy!
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 21, 2010
  11. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    The leaves you're showing in the label photo look like P. avium leaves, quite different from the leaves in all the other blossom photos. I'm guessing those are from a branch growing from the rootstock and that there is not a branch with those leaves that has those flowers.

    Someone named Gary Shields has posted a photo on flickr of 'Okumiyako' at Savill Garden in Great Windsor Park, a garden we just visited on Douglas Justice's tour. Some growers' websites describe that cultivar as looking like the flickr photo.
     
  12. Vdunne1952

    Vdunne1952 Active Member

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    Hi Wendy,
    Yes, I 've seen that photo and it follows the description most give o.k.
    Re: photos 1 and 2. These are the same tree and you can see the P. padus flowers in the background of photo 2. So, I am assuming (for the moment) that this tree is Prunus padus itself, or another cultivar. Definitely not 'Okumiayako'. Pretty bad for a Botanic Garden.
     
  13. Vdunne1952

    Vdunne1952 Active Member

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    I agree about the leaves. The label must be attached to a rootstock shoot (although this is hard to see in photo 1. Weird!
     

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