Propagating Angels Trumpets and Taro

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by Wanab, Jun 2, 2005.

  1. Wanab

    Wanab Member

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    Does anyone know how to sucessfully propagate Angels Trumpets & Violet Stemmed Taro?
     
  2. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hello Wanab, Brugmansia (angel's trumpet) is easily propagated by cuttings. Angel's trumpet could also mean Datura, which can also be propagated by cuttings. Just use a little rooting hormone and keep the cuttings in a moist environment, I usually start cuttings in sealed plastic bags or under inverted clear containers. Both can also be grown easily from seeds. These plants are deadly poison, so don't ingest any part and take caution with children and pets.

    I don't know about the taro.
     
  3. Megami

    Megami Active Member 10 Years

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    If you can get a taro tuber just put it in the ground, give it lots of water, and it will grow. Very fast too... I planted a regular green grocery store taro and it grew like mad and was a foot tall with 2 big leaves within a week. They grow scary fast!

    They like a lot of water and can be grown along side ponds or just in regular dirt - if they are given enough water.
     
  4. dogseadepression

    dogseadepression Active Member

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    Wanab, angels trumpets are grown for cuttings here are some suggestions: 1. fill pots with sterile medium (potting soil) 2. take cutting early in the day when the plants are full of moisture, using a sharp knife snip 5- to 6- inch pieces, romove leaves from lower half of cutting. 3.Dip the lower cut ends of the cuttings in liqiud or powdered rooting hormone shake offany excess. Using a back of a pencil or spoon make 1- to 1 1/2- inch- deep holes in the rooting medium spacing them 1 to 2 inches apart, firm soil around the cuttings and water with fine spray, Don't forget to label them with plant name and date the cuttings were taken. enclose the container in a plastic bag and store it in warm temperature and provide humity in a warm shaded dark room and always open the bag for venalation so they don't rot.
    Taro it is simple if you follow my directions: divide the taro by diging it up and use a sharp knife or spade and slice the tubers apart in the spring. You will have plenty of taro plants for next year.
    Wyatt Reinhart Macomb, IL
     

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