problem with squirrels

Discussion in 'Garden Design and Plant Suggestions' started by MBishop, Oct 1, 2007.

  1. MBishop

    MBishop Member

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    I live in Southern California. I want to plant another tree in my backyard and am looking for suggestions on trees that would not be as attractive to squirrels as the ones that I have planted thusfar. I planted 2 liquid ambers and within weeks the squirrels had gnawed away large areas of bark. I have wrapped the trees in netting, hung blank CD's from the limbs and tried everything to deter them without much luck. Is there a tree out there whose bark would be less interesting for the squirrels to use as teeth sharpeners? I thought about a eucalyptis but don't know. Thanks.
     
  2. Dave-Florida

    Dave-Florida Active Member

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    Considering that American sweetgums are native to areas with squirrels (and so is the Taiwanese species), I wonder what the little beasts are up to.

    An acquaintance has acquired two Jack Russell terrier pups, named Sparky and Mango, to protect the fruit.

    Bark wrap is available. . . .
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    There's sure to be a great variety of kinds that they would not be interested in, maybe best to inquire locally. There is probably a taste or aroma that the sweetgum trees have that they like. Having this happen with those two trees does not demonstrate that most trees tried would suffer this fate. In fact, there are many large sweetgums scattered around southern California neighborhoods so squirrels apparently aren't bothering them consistently throughout the area. Deer can also be unpredictable.
     
  4. Karalyn

    Karalyn Active Member

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    Well, as stated before, my Sheltie collie keeps the squirrels inline and invisible squirrels. They do love my walnut tree and plant the walnuts and I get english waluts growing up everywhere.

    I think maybe the only thing besides a cat or dog to compete with them is a trap.

    Since I'm a transplanted Californian through marriage, we had a gorgeous sweetgum growing in San Jose. I loved it. And I sure miss the eulcalyptus trees.

    So plant it if you love them. And get a beebee gun. Or maybe a paintball gun.
    I have never heard of squirrels gnawing on tree bark, just eating the fruit or more breaking the seed pods or seed pits of fruit or maple trees. And planting the apricot pits and walnuts.
     
  5. MBishop

    MBishop Member

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    I may just have to take my chances with the squirrels. I am thinking that possibly a sycamore tree might work because it has no bark to be chewed off. Apparently the chewing is a way to sharpen their teeth and also for the males to impress the lady squirrels. Whatever the reasons they did stop the growth of the main stem on both of my little liquid amber trees by pulling the bark off. I can't bear the thought of a trap that would hurt them so I guess I will just have to put up with them. Thanks for all your comments.
     
  6. Dixie

    Dixie Active Member

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    we have a large number of trees on campus affected by this activity. i have yet to see damage on sycamore. they mainly stick to the oaks, any species, honeylocust, hackberry, magnolias. we have tried live trapping and relocating without much improvement. none of the "repellents" worked either. i think it is just a nuisance of nature we have to deal with. they have been quite an expensive pest for us.
     
  7. MBishop

    MBishop Member

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    Thanks for your comments. I agree with you that there is probably nothing available that would deter them and yet not harm them. They have seriously damaged two of my trees already and I appreciate your comment about sycamores because I will try that next to replace an old tree that has died and needs replacing. Thanks again.
     
  8. Dave-Florida

    Dave-Florida Active Member

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    Sycamores are known to inhibit the growth of other trees. They may be distasteful to squirrels.
     

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