Problem Garden

Discussion in 'Garden Design and Plant Suggestions' started by MannieBoo, May 14, 2009.

  1. MannieBoo

    MannieBoo Active Member

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    Location:
    Stewiacke Nova Scotia, Zone 5A
    I have a small garden along the east side of my house, the soil isn't the greatest, I have to water it during the hot spells because the rain rarely comes down in that direction. the only plants that I have growing there right now are three different Hostas, one miniature bleeding heart, a young Lady's Mantle (3 yrs) a transplanted native fern and a blue lungwort which until this year was doing great and a white lungwort which is barely striving. I've taken a couple of pictures. What other plants could I grow there besides what I have already had. I have tried planting some Campion and some Goose Neck, but they have died. Any suggestions.
     

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  2. MannieBoo

    MannieBoo Active Member

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    Location:
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    I realize this is a stumper, so I've pretty much decided that it will be Hostas for this garden and an Astilbe. I might as well stay with what works.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2009
  3. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio
    Perhaps a sedum? Mine do well in full sun, and there are varieties which are drought-tolerant. My neighbor across the street has had beautiful full clumps of showy stonecrop for years and never does a thing to them! Mine are looking good, too. ---I agree with the philosophy of choosing plants with which you've already had success! Makes sense.
     
  4. MannieBoo

    MannieBoo Active Member

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    Location:
    Stewiacke Nova Scotia, Zone 5A
    I apologize to those who have seen this thread, I got my directions wrong the garden is on the west side of my house and that the picture was taken after 4:00pm, and the only sun this side of my house gets (west Side) is after 3:00, the erly part of the day is nothig but shade. It doesn't get much natural moisture because it never seems to rain from the west.
     
  5. Laticauda

    Laticauda Active Member

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    Location:
    Oklahoma, US
    A lot of sedums would do well there. I have an "angelina" on my west wall, and it does great! I also have my mini burro's tail, dragon's blood, trailing ice plant, tricolor sedum and another sedum similar to the dragon's blood on that wall! I really like the trailing ice plant, beautiful purple blooms in the spring!
     
  6. TownMouse

    TownMouse Member

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    Location:
    Eastern area Pacific Northwest, USA
    Horrible thought: watch the weeds in your neighborhood for those that seem to thrive in like conditions.
    Select one that is attractive to _your eye_. Then propagate it like the dickens.
    I did this in a small area and am thrilled with the lush greenery of the little devil (stays blackish-green at -30F, and grows bright green at the first sign of any sun).
     
  7. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Not so horrible! I have encouraged various plants which have appeared in my beds: evening primrose and Verbascum, among others. I like 'em; they are obviously perfectly suited to my area; and I admit to being pleased that they chose me. One person's weed is another person's flower. Like it? Grow it!
     
  8. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    gulf island, bc, canada
    My first suggestion would be to mulch the bed with wood chips: you'll retain more of the little moisture it gets, to the benefit of your planting. Many types of geranium would do well there, euphorbias (perhaps not in your zone?) would thrive; columbines as well....Centranthus ruber (AKA Red Valerian, Jupiter's Beard...) would probably do well, though self seeds prolifically if you don't deadhead it. If mulched, you could try galium along the edge to form an eventual groundcover. It typically likes moisture, but I have it growing under west facing eaves (mulched), and it's forming a nice mat.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2009

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