Privet hedge

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by marylou830, Jun 20, 2007.

  1. marylou830

    marylou830 Active Member

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    I want my privet to grow tall and wide. What should I do?
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Keep it growing well. Basic operations that encourage growth of shrubs in general are mulching, watering and fertilizing. Sample soil and have it analyzed before fertilizing.
     
  3. levilyla

    levilyla Active Member

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    prune the top more narrow than the botom so it doesn't get ugly legs.
     
  4. Dixie

    Dixie Active Member

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  5. levilyla

    levilyla Active Member

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    Well...it sort of is everywhere.
     
  6. marylou830

    marylou830 Active Member

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    I actually bought it from a landscaping business, so maybe it's not the one that grows wild and becomes a pest. I haven't seen many of these in the wild. They called it ligustrum something and it has light green variegated leaves. It's quite pretty to me. I bought it for a fast-growing privacy screen, but it's not growing that fast. I want to prune it the right way to make it come back fuller and taller next season.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Ligustrum = privet, does not denote any particular kind. Pruning reduces overall size increase. If you wish to have a clipped hedge, you will want to head back periodically as it develops so that the finished hedge has a dense interior. If this is going to be an informal hedge, heading it back will just slow it down a bit each time - and alter its natural shape.
     
  8. Dixie

    Dixie Active Member

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    It is probably Ligustrum sinense 'Varigata' (the invasive one), just the variegated form. Nurseries in the south still sell Japanese honeysuckle too, Lonicera japonica, and it is very invasive and listed on many states invasive species list as well. Many people aren't aware of its invasiveness. We are restoring a nature area that is over run with the privet and choking out all of the native desireables. here is a picture in the winter. ALL of the green you can see is privet (not the variegated form, though). For some reason the variegated form isn't as problematic. I don't think it is planted as widely as the other, maybe?
     

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    Last edited: Jun 21, 2007
  9. marylou830

    marylou830 Active Member

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    Oh dear, I'll keep a close eye on any little ones that may pop up. I don't want it to look like that picture! Thanks for the info.
     
  10. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Because it is less vigorous - the white/yellow parts of the leaves don't do any photosynthesis or only very little. However, any seed that they produce will likely give normal dark green, invasive seedlings.
     
  11. Dixie

    Dixie Active Member

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    thanks!
     
  12. Frank Egan

    Frank Egan Member

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    Hi Folks,

    First time poster. Found your thread about privets interesting. My neighbors want more privacy and I want to oblige them. And futher, I need to keep the deer out
    of my vineyard to be. Am tracking on ligostrum vulgare (Euro privet) planted on one foot centers. Had originally thought poplars and hawthorns might work. I need an inpenetrable hedge and I can't eat that many deer. Any experience or thoughts on this matter are appreciated. Further, the height needs to be only seven feet, width no problem. I do need to have adequate air drainage for drying after rains and air movement to mitigate frosts.

    Thanks and best wishes.

    Frank
     
  13. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  14. marylou830

    marylou830 Active Member

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    What exactly is "fast growing" for these hedges? I've had mine for almost 2 years now and they haven't really grown very fast. I'm wondering what I need to do to make mine grow faster, because I needed a fast-growing hedge when I bought them. I don't plan to shape them because I like the natural look. I applied fertilizer about 3 months ago. I haven't seen any new little ones growing anywhere nearby.
     
  15. Frank Egan

    Frank Egan Member

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    Thanks Liz.

    If so, it appears that it is coastal or Hawaii. I checked on
    http://plants.usda.gov/java/nameSearch and it only tolerates
    temps down 7 degrees. So that leaves out most of the country.

    Frank
     
  16. Dixie

    Dixie Active Member

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    i like the idea of hawthorn. they do very well here and would not be fun for deer to try and get through.
     
  17. Frank Egan

    Frank Egan Member

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    Thanks Dixie,

    I'm beginning to think the hawthorn may be the ticket. Upon further review, it appears that the deer do like privet. Sources (several) I've found so far say the deer won't eat hawthorn and other sources say domestic animals won't penetrate it. Further they can provide food and shelter for the small creatures and my bees, which I encourage.

    Which brings up more questions.....how fast does it grow, how many feet on center to provide an effective barrier, and where to find the seed stock for local varieties?
    I found seed stock for some varieties but not for crataegus coccinoides (AR & KS),
    crataegus arkansana (AR), crataegus crythrocarpa (MO) and crataegus mollis (MO).
    Interesting that crataegus mollis flower is the state flower of MO.

    If you know of any folks in Arkansas/Missouri doing work in this area, do let me know. I am sort of at a disadvantage working 11 months out of the year in California and doing soil prep for a vineyard in Arkansas. Thanks for your encouragement.

    Best.

    Frank
     
  18. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Pittosporum tenuifolium tolerates temperatures down to about -8 to -10°C, hardy in coastal regions of Britain - so it isn't quite as tropical as you thought. But still true that it won't do well in the vast majority of the US, just on the Pacific coast and Florida.
     
  19. Dixie

    Dixie Active Member

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    Post or Weideker? or neither. Where is Busch, AR located?
     
  20. Frank Egan

    Frank Egan Member

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    Hi Dixie. Neither. Busch (72631) is 10 miles N of Eureka Springs just across the White River on 62W and down stream from Beaver Lake.

    Interesting that with the exception of one, no one has clicked on the tourism potential for wineries in NW AR. MO is exploding in vineyard growth. AR appears to be fighting amongst themselves and old ghosts. Am taking the long slow approach to
    soil building. Where are you located?

    Best.

    Frank
     
  21. Dixie

    Dixie Active Member

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    Fort Smith. used to live in Berryville, 10 miles east of Eureka. However, I am a Fayetteville native. We recently went to St. Louis and on the way noticed how many vineyards are in southern mo. my hort professor specialized in grape breeding. we are getting ready to plant the Crusador hawthorne, which of course is thornless, but Crataegus crus-galli (cockspur hawthorne) is supposed to be very disease resistant. Good luck.
     
  22. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Re Hawthorn and deer. My goats like hawthorn are you sure deer won't like it???? Also I suspect it will take some time to grow to what you call a reasonable hedge. We have very old ones here that are remnants of the first settlers farm fences approx 100+ years and they really are reasonable now. (if tou get snow they probably are good as they loose leaves) The Pittosporum I was speaking about would give a really good hedge in about 5 years. I am in cool temperate very rarely down to under 5C but hot summers in high 30C. Usually fair to good rain in cooler months but they have grown well in the drought. Seem to be tolerant of dry conditions just droop leaves till it cools down. They also have waxy leaves that help with water retention so once est. grow well. Most people start with plants about a foot high and plant them approx yard to 2 yards (1.5 ) meters apart. I am currently watching a hedge up the road that is going to block a great view out in the next couple of years. It has been in 9 months and is racing away.

    Liz
     
  23. Frank Egan

    Frank Egan Member

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    Aw shucks. Was hoping you were closer. :-) Thanks for the tip on the cockspur. Am
    definetly pre-disposed to thorns. I need to eventually have cows and also want to keep the busybodies out of my business. This barrier/hedge must be inpenetrable.
    I am looking at +/- 2200 running feet to surround 5 acres. Given the cost of a 7 foot
    high tensil multiwire fence, this could be a bargain.
    I have a pretty good handle on soil health. Have an excellent background in organic/biodynamics. I test soil twice annually and have good support from the county agent in B'ville. I'd like to find the appropriate CV and supplier soon so I can plan a spring planting. Would be nice to find a source for funding, but I dream a lot.

    Thanks again.

    Frank
     
  24. Frank Egan

    Frank Egan Member

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    Thanks Liz for bringing up those issues. Does keep me focused. I have two different lists of deer and non deer plants. And hawthorn makes the no deer column in both.
    We do get about 3 inches of snow each Dec, Jan & Feb. Temps can go as low as 5F. That is not to say that it won't happen. Goats as you know will nearly eat anything that is living. Deer are a bit more selective and there are many plants they won't touch. Thorned Hawthorn is a very formidable plant and should work. Understood that they are slower growth than either the privet or poplar. My thoughts though were to plant them on an even closer center and prune the sides to force an upward growth. I only need a little over 2 meters to make it work. I do have a handle on the fertility issues and between adequate rainfall in this zone and deep well, the issue then becomes the cultivar and source. Am really looking forward to this challenge.
    Many thanks.

    Frank
     

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