Privacy tree recommendations

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by GG27, Jul 29, 2012.

  1. GG27

    GG27 Member

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    Location:
    Gabriola Island, BC, Canada
    I'm looking for suggestions for a tree which would screen out a view. It's on the edge of the driveway, so well drained, perhaps too much so. Really no restrictions for height or width. It faces northwest & get mainly afternoon sun. Evergreen or deciduous is fine & I am fine watering it for the first couple of years but would like something a bit more drought tolerant as I'm on a gulf island. thanks, GG
     
  2. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

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    How high/wide is the view you need to screen? Do you need to screen from the ground up?
     
  3. GG27

    GG27 Member

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    I don't need to screen the bottom portion, I would like more of a tree shape than a shrub shape, although I suppose if a shrub would screen as high as I need that would be fine too. I probably need to screen from about 4'-5' from the ground & then 20'+. I am screening the neighbours house from my patio, we like our neighbours but we also would like to have some privacy when we are sitting on the patio. Along part of the driveway I have put in various evergreen hedging & while they will eventually do the job they aren't very interesting. I would see this tree from my kitchen window where I do dishes everyday so something interesting would be great.
     
  4. Sea Witch

    Sea Witch Active Member

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    Vancouver Island, BC, Canada, Zone 7
    I vote for an evergreen Magnolia, Magnolia grandiflora (smells great too), Cedrus deodara (Himalayan Cedar), Tsuga canadensis (Eastern Hemlock), or Tilia sp. (Linden)--deciduous, but can get LARGE and FULL.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    What kind of soil, sandy, rocky and droughty or more retentive? This has a big effect on what will remain looking good without watering.
     
  6. GG27

    GG27 Member

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    The soil here is non existent, I have brought in 32 yards of top soil so far but it doesn't go far. It is sandy & rocky. I don't mind watering it somewhat but my garden has to do with water collection to cisterns only, sometimes by the end of summer my cisterns are pretty dry. I'm having a problem trying to keep a weeping katsura from curled leaves which I'm thinking is a water issue.
     
  7. GG27

    GG27 Member

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    Thanks for these, some of them are way too much like what surrounds me (I'm in a forest) so the cedar & hemlock are off the list. I do like the linden, I wonder if the magnolia would be too open for privacy? Large & full isn't a problem, I have lots of space.
     
  8. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
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    ...Robinia psuedoacacia `Frisia`, Arbutus unedo, Elaeagnus angustifolia...
     
  9. GG27

    GG27 Member

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    Oh I looked at a golden locust the other day & wondered if it would be good, arbutus unedo was on my short list, thank you for confirming this would be a good choice. I haven't seen the olive tree here, but it looks interesting too. I now seem to have at least 5 good choices, I will now have to see what I can get here. Thank you all..... now if I could just get my weepy weeping katsura to smarten up.... :)
     
  10. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

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    Missed that you are surrounded by forest; might be rough on the arbutus unedo, as it's prone to getting black leaf spotting (quite badly) in damper, forested sites. Locust still works, though.
     
  11. Sea Witch

    Sea Witch Active Member

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    Location:
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    Magnolia grandifolia and Linden would both be very thick for privacy and both are known to be drought resistant once established.
     
  12. GG27

    GG27 Member

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    I think I forgot to mention this, I tend to forget.... thanks for letting me know about arbutus, I don't need any more problem plants.
     
  13. GG27

    GG27 Member

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    The linden looks very nice. I had a magnolia grandiflora at my last house & I remember it being very drought resistant, thanks for reminding me. Now I will have to see what the garden centres here have in stock as I would like to get one of some size.
     
  14. Sea Witch

    Sea Witch Active Member

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    Personally, I planted a beech (Fagus grandifolia) for privacy. Will be a massive deciduous tree. It's also drought resistant when established. Also, although it's deciduous, it likes to hang on to its dead leaves over the winter until the new ones come out in the spring. Then it drops all the dead ones at once over a day or two. Interesting!
     
  15. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years

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    Columnar beeches of either the green or the purple persuasion would look nice.
     
  16. GG27

    GG27 Member

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    Thanks, I'll put fagus on the list as well. I have a small albizia julibrissin that needs to be moved, would that work? I have another spot to put it if not.
     
  17. Sea Witch

    Sea Witch Active Member

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    The Albizia julibrissin is beautiful (I have one too), but it's not a tree that will get massive. It's not a tree that I would use for privacy.
     
  18. GG27

    GG27 Member

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    That was my inclination but I'm happy to have someone else's opinion. I have another spot for it that "needs" a smaller but beautiful specimen which I think will fit the bill.
     
  19. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    There are some 50' silk trees around, be sure the new spot has room for it to spread.
     
  20. GG27

    GG27 Member

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    OH.... hhhmmmmm may have to rethink the new spot, it has space for about a 20' spread, height isn't as much of an issue....
    Mind you, we get some wicked winds here, didn't I read that they are quite fragile? The one I was given was given to me because the leader snapped in last years big storm & the giver had a different shape in mind.
     
  21. Sea Witch

    Sea Witch Active Member

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    I grew up with that tree in the front yard in Louisiana. We called it a mimosa tree. It was a beautiful tree, but it was never more than about 25' across and about 25' high in 15 years. And it wasn't what I'd call "thick". It was a great tree for climbing. ;o)
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2012

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