Privacy Please!

Discussion in 'Garden Design and Plant Suggestions' started by nikpadio, Jan 17, 2007.

  1. nikpadio

    nikpadio Member

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    Location:
    Napa, califronia, USA
    I live in Napa, Ca. and I have a large back yard. Unfortunatly my neighbor sits higher than we do and can look down into our yard. I currently have a 6 foot fence but wold need to add another 6 feet to great a privacy barrier.

    I don't want to plant trees along the back as I have raised beds for a garden that get's all day sun. Grape vines are out as we need privacy year round.

    Does anyone have any design ideas so that I could build arches and allow a fast growing vine to fill in and ultmately give me the privacy I desire?

    I want to try to do this ona limited budget. What kind of materials would work? rebar, PVC piping inserted into the soil? Something creative and fun would be great. If anyone has pictures that would be nice as well.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. bioramani

    bioramani Member

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    Location:
    Bangalore, India
    Can you consider ALAMANDA creeper?
    See:
    http://www.gardeningeden.co.za/plants-cryptostegia-grandiflora.html

    In Bangalore we also get an alamanda with Lemon Yellow flowers. Contrasts beautifully with the pink. I have planted this to climb over a galvanised iron wire trellis (6"x6") wired on to a 1"x1" angle iron frame. The creeper does not clutter up the base but fills the upper reaches of the frame. Flowers profusely throughout the year. Tends to run riot though. Needs to be kept pruned. By properly tying the shoots to the verticals and horizontals one can get a good visual barrier. The blooms also act as foci of attention.

    A 6' long established plant with flowers can be bought from local nurseries for less than USD 2 .

    bioramani
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 18, 2007
  3. nikpadio

    nikpadio Member

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    Location:
    Napa, califronia, USA
    Thank ou for your information. I'll look into Alamanda, it sounds beautiful. My only problem now is to design a structure high enough to allow it to creep.
     
  4. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Maryland USA zone 7
    Hi Nikpadio,

    I'm not sure that Bioramani's suggestion of Purple Alamanda - Cryptostegia grandiflora would work for you. It only grows to 12' and is only hardy to zone 10. I get your hardiness zone as 9. You can check with this zip code zone finder if you aren't certain of your hardiness zone.
    http://www.gardenweb.com/zones/zip.cgi

    Here's info on purple alamanda.
    http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plants/Asclepiadaceae/Cryptostegia_grandiflora.html

    There are several types of alamanda aka allamande (note the two L's) and most, if not all, are only hardy to zone 10. You can get some info here on their common names or their botanical (scientific names). Keep this site as a reference for vines and shrubs as you do your research. It doesn't have pretty pictures, but does have loads of other helpful info.
    http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/shrubs/

    Maybe a native honeysuckle would work for you. In zone 9, if you select carefully, it should remain evergreen, bloom on and off all spring, summer and fall, will feed the hummingbirds with nectar, the birds with berries and isn't invasive. Lonicera sempervirens is a native honeysuckle that comes in different colors and varieties.
    http://www.sbs.utexas.edu/mbierner/bio406d/images/pics/cap/lonicera_sempervirens.htm

    Lonicera sempervirens 'Blanche Sandman'
    http://www.gardenvines.com/catalog/lonicera-blanche-sandman-p-112.html

    Lonicera sempervirens 'Alabama Crimson'
    http://www.gardenvines.com/catalog/....html?osCsid=0d261de6a5200e2a91b0ae7917319da1

    Lonicera sempervirens 'Major Wheeler'
    http://www.gardenvines.com/catalog/....html?osCsid=0d261de6a5200e2a91b0ae7917319da1

    Lonicera sempervirens 'Magnifica'
    http://www.gardenvines.com/catalog/....html?osCsid=0d261de6a5200e2a91b0ae7917319da1

    Lonicera heckrottii 'Gold Flame' aka Goldflame honeysuckle is a cross between a native Lonicera sempervirens and a non-native with the misleading name of Lonicera americana. It's not a purebred native but it's not invasive and is fragrant. The fragrance can be variable on this one so purchase in bloom if fragrance is important to you.
    http://www.hort.uconn.edu/plants/l/lonhec/lonhec1.html

    Please DO NOT plant the invasive pest Lonicera japonica aka Japanese honeysuckle aka Hall's honeysuckle aka Lonicera japonica 'Hall's' aka Lonicera purpurea or purple honeysuckle. It's a cream and white flower and is fragrant, but has made a mess of many natural areas.

    If you decide to mail order plants you can use this site to check references. You can also search for reputable nurseries in your area and even search by plant material.
    http://davesgarden.com/gwd/

    Have you considered adding a lattice to the top of the fence to add to the height of the fence? I don't know if it would be allowed where you live so you might have to check as there may be height restrictions for your fence. You can see in this picture what I'm talking about.
    http://ourhouse.ninemsn.com.au/ourhouse/factsheets/db/makeovers/08/841.asp

    Maybe something along the lines of this trellis could be added to your fence.
    http://www.cedar-outdoor.org/cedar_projects/arbors/trellis_fence.htm

    If it fits with the decor of your landscape, consider using copper pipes. You don't have to be a plumber and there's even a special solderless bonding product that you can use and don't need to sweat to 'glue' the copper fittings together.
    http://www.trelliscraft.com/index.htm
    http://www.justforcopper.com/

    Or you could make more then one copper trellis. Here's another style.
    http://www.homeenvy.com/db/5/105.html

    This site sells copper fencing, but I can see making just the top part and mounting it on your fence.
    http://www.gidesigns.net/garden-decor/customer/product.php?productid=61

    Newt
     
  5. seagonus

    seagonus Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Abbotsford BC
    My father and I recently replaced an aging and very large Gazebo. We went to a used building materials supply store and had a look around. I got some 1/4 inch X 4 inch tubed steel and cut for 4 pillars. We then placed pressure treated 12 foot long poles overtop. I have 20-30 year old kiwis and grapes growing overtop of it.

    Looks great, and will probably outlast me.
     
  6. Aileen

    Aileen Member

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    Location:
    Victoria
    Nikkpadio-Hello
    Before I make a suggestion,what type of construction is the 6 foot fence? I think that rebar or the copper pipe would be good.
    Good luck,I'll wait for your reply
    Aileen
     
  7. nikpadio

    nikpadio Member

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    Location:
    Napa, califronia, USA
    Thank you for your response. My fence is standard cedar. I really am leaning towards PVC pipes place into PVC in the ground and then bent into arches with some type of wire or mesh attached for the vine to grow on. By doing this I cold have a very high screen. I'm not very good at construction but I guess you have to start somewhere.

    Thanks,

    NIK
     
  8. Aileen

    Aileen Member

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    Location:
    Victoria
    Nikpado- As you have a traditional cedar fence I have a couple of suggestions for evergreen vines for your area.Trachelospermum,Star jasmine or two varieties of Jasminum grandiflorum 20' and or jasmine officinale 30'. How does Polygonum aubertii grow (mile a minute vine)-this will cover 100 sq.ft. the first year!
    If you use p.v.c. will you spray paint it black?
    Have fun,hope these suggestions are helpful.
    Aileen
     
  9. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Maryland USA zone 7
    With no disrespect to Aileen, Polygonum aubertii aka mile a minute vine aka Chinese fleecevine aka silverlace vine is listed by the California Invasive Plant Council as a potential problem.
    http://www.cal-ipc.org/ip/management/alerts/index.php

    Newt
     
  10. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Beaverton, Oregon
    How hot does it get in summer?

    What would be a typical hot temperature that you would expect to see maybe half a dozen days in the summer?

    What is an unusually hot day?

    The average summer temperature?
     
  11. nikpadio

    nikpadio Member

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    Location:
    Napa, califronia, USA
    The summer is usually in the high 80's to low 90's with the occasional over 100 for a day or two. The thing is that we will be hot in the day but the fog comes in off of the bay and cools the valley at night. That is why the wine grapes grow so well. Natures air conditioner.

    I'm learning towrds a combo of jasmin and honey suckle. Any forseen problems with that ? I currently have some potato vine that does quite well with very little maintnance but lacks fragrance.

    Thanks

    NIK
     
  12. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Beaverton, Oregon
    Sounds like Portland, Oregon summer temps in the day, with Seaside, Oregon evening conditions.

    I'm fond of trumpet vine with the red lipstick colored flowers.
     
  13. Tsmith2579

    Tsmith2579 Member

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    Location:
    Birmingham, AL USA
    Consider this. Using 1.5 inch PVC pipe and 4 x 8 ft PVC lattice, you can erect a lattice work extension above your fence. THe lattice comes in white, tan-wood or green. The pvc pipe will attach easily to your wood fence and the lattice attaches easily to the pipe. This allows you to add up to 8 feet in height. Then decide on which vine you want to grow on it. The lattice allows wind to blow through thus reducing the chance of blow-down. You may want to consider planting some type of climbing rose such as New Dawn. It is almost carefree, everblooming and has beautiful, soft pink blooms.
     
  14. DandyLioness

    DandyLioness Active Member

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    Location:
    Victoria BC Canada
    Silver Lace Vine will cover in a very short time. It grows VERY fast, looks nice and has some lovely lacey flowers to boot. If you find a supporting structure, this may be a good choice.
     
  15. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Maryland USA zone 7
    DandyLioness, please read my post of January 31st, 2007 where I explain this that silver lace vine is considered an invasive.

    Newt
     
  16. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Victoria Australia [cool temperate]
    Polygonum aubertii
    Silvervine Fleeceflower, Silver Lace Vine
    Polygonaceae is also deciduous

    I have wire fences up to 8 ft. We are in the country so neighbours are not on top of us but given wire fences every one uses all sorts of methods from hedges to creepers/vines. I have a mixture of vines and some old fashioned fushias (tiny flowers) that help to act as suport and a hedge. I have old red geraniums and some climbing roses and every thing happily clambers on the fences making what I once saw refered to as a tapestry hedge. Instead of trying to put something on top of the existing fence why don't you build a frame (poly pipe if that is choice) with wire attached in front of the fence to the height you need it so that you have total control over the climbers. You could also use treated trellis instead of wire and it would all ready act as a screen. I use ones to screen my dogs from the road that are tall and narrow and are about 8 or 9 foot. Anyway over here they come in all sizes.

    http://www.homesite.com.au/outdoors/fences-and-walls/lattice/projects-diy/diy-build-a-lattice-fence

    There is also plastic or steel trellis that may work even better becase it has it's own frame

    http://www.spec-net.com.au/links/link178.htm

    Here's another idea using matting
    http://www.houseofbamboo.com.au/frameset.php?title=Applications&url=applications.php
     
  17. KarinL

    KarinL Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Vancouver
    That steel stuff is cool - like the bamboo too.
     
  18. Chuck White

    Chuck White Active Member

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    Location:
    Florida,USA
    A note of caution: Some municipalities limit side and rear fences to a height of 6 feet. To avoid possible disappointment, check with your local Building Department. If they turn you down, go to Areca palms.
     
  19. DandyLioness

    DandyLioness Active Member

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    Location:
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    Newt, lots of things can be invasive if not kept in check... that includes my gorgeous Wisteria.
     
  20. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
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    DandyLioness, since the original post was from California, I was referencing that area of the US. And yes, wisteria IS invasive in may areas of the world. Keeping a plant in check can often mean pruning so that not one single berry has the opportunity to go into the stomach of any bird. Such is the case with the silver lace vine. Others like wisteria can send up shoots all over the garden and even invade houses. So, the word invasive doesn't just mean down the road or into the woods, but can happen in the garden.

    Newt
     

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