Preserving Plant Produce

Discussion in 'Fruit and Vegetable Gardening' started by Durgan, May 7, 2022.

  1. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    Preserving plant food for off season use. This is how plant food is preserved for off season use. The conventionally methods have been tried and all are wanting so a new method has been developed.

    Method is:

    Pick plant food about 15 to 20 pounds, wash, cut in smaller pieces, cook until soft, strain through a 2mm mesh screen to remove seeds and gross fiber, strain through a Champion juicer if available to get maximum nutrients, Pour into one liter glass jars, Cook in a PRESSURE OOKER AT 15 PSI FOR 15 MINUTES in batches of 7 the capacity of my pressure cooker.. Cool and store in boxes of 12 and store at room temperature. They keep for 1 to 3 years. Not one jar has ever spoiled. Processed are all plant food about 400 one liter jars each year. My journal has pictures of much plant food. durgan.org | Garden Journal Started 2011. Garden Journal, Brantford Ontatrio Zone 5. Property 0.4 Acre with large vegetable garden and fruit trees. Produce is pressure canned, dehydrated, and cold room stored. Objective is to avoid commercial processed food.
    I drink about two glasses daily. Opened are two jars daily and mixed in the drinking glass.

    2 September 2021 Tomatoes (Straining)
































     
  2. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    Has nobody got views on preservation for long term or off season? Lord know there is little practiced.
     
  3. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I prefer to preserve green vegetables by freezing and use pressure canning for tomatoes, grape juice, apple sauce, and some pickled items. I think that freezing preserves more of the nutrients in green vegetables and certainly preserves more of the original textures. Freezing also appears better for most fruits (e.g., blueberries, raspberries, strawberries), although canning is great for peaches. Drying is another good preservation option that I use primarily for mushrooms.
     
  4. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    Having a 15 hundrd square feet producing fruit ad vegetables almost all at the same time means most is dicarded due to convenient lack of preserving methods. I ave experimented with all the conventional methods and all have shortcomings. Useful for small quantities.

    Freezing usually needs power, good for meat.
    Conventional canning has limitations, it is slow.
    Drying and dehydrating has limited use.
    Root cellar for some products is practical.
    Dried grains are most useful.
    Pickling is for small quantities.

    Most people avoid long term storage. Most people don't attempt a garden.
     

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