potted lauris nobilis

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by 2annbrow, Oct 26, 2009.

  1. 2annbrow

    2annbrow Active Member

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    Location:
    North Bend OR US;Oregon coast, just N of Coos Bay
    My bay tree , which is about three feet tall, is in a pot from the nursery, and the leaves are turning yellowish instead of green. My friend says it needs iron, but I'm not sure.
    [I did use a diluted solution of iron on dwarf magnolia variety Ann, for similar leaf yellowing, and that hasn't stopped growing & blooming since (2 years and it never goes entirely dormant).]

    Should I try on the bay tree 1) a very dilute solution of iron, 2) repotting it, or 3) planting it in the ground? It's been in the pot since it came from the nursery 2 years ago.
    Would sure hate to lose it, as the fresh leaves have a fabulous flavor, quite different from SO,SO dried bay leaves!
     
  2. Keke

    Keke Active Member 10 Years

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    Vancouver, BC CANADA
    Nope, it doesn't need iron. For one thing, this is the time of year bay trees lose some leaves (I think they drop the old ones in response to the lower light), and second, yours probably has outgrown its nursery pot. I found mine exhibited more yellow leaves when it was potbound than when it wasn't. Although I normally wouldn't suggest repotting at this time of year, you might consider it. Go up 2" or more, and unwind any roots looping around the root ball before repotting.

    It probably can go in the ground -- even in a pot. Bay trees can handle -7C in the ground according to the Sunset Western Garden Book, and mine (with cover) survived -15C. I'm a Sunset 4B so you're probably fine.

    I agree about the taste of the leaves! I love giving fresh "kitchen wreaths" of bay as Christmas gifts to my foodie friends.
    keke
     
  3. Dana09

    Dana09 Active Member

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    Location:
    Vancouver Island BC
    And I have read that the dried release more flavour and home grown, home dried have to be better than what's at the store. Friends like getting their annual supply at xmas from me too! Never thought to do a little wreath tho, that's a great idea when mine regrows some, after recovering from last winter when half of it died back.
    It is very tough in the ground, at least the root is and the trunk is very thick - 6" where it was widest before freezing in one of my yard's most protected areas.
    I had topiary styled it into 5 stacked balls but it grew way too big for the spot and I had to cut away two of them last summer and gave away bags and bags of organic bay leaves at the SallyAnn. I had also tried root pruning it to keep it at 'bay' ha ha! It was getting so big it was starting to scare me!
    Then we had a real winter and problem solved, the bay is now reduced to a humble, manageable size once more at only 4.5 ft.
    It shoots from the base every year and more cuttings are then available or long stems of leaves later on when they get stiff enough for drying. They are late to start growing in Spring, waiting for some time in June before they take off again when growing in the ground here.

    D
     
  4. 2annbrow

    2annbrow Active Member

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    Location:
    North Bend OR US;Oregon coast, just N of Coos Bay
    Thank you, Keke & Dana!
    I too make xmas wreaths for presents, starting with fresh rosemary (those huge bushes stay green all year) and then accenting with little bundles of my bay, oregano, variegated sage, and some dried chive flowers. Sometimes I add accents of purchased dried chilis, cinnamon sticks, and tiny net bags of cloves or nutmegs, and an itty-bitty grater. I also (for my culinarily-challenged friends) add a small leaflet with suggestions for use.
     

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