Potted JM too big?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Dsm1gb, Dec 25, 2018.

  1. Dsm1gb

    Dsm1gb Member

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    My local nursery and (family friend) has obtained a thick 6 foot, 25 gallon Oshio-Beni from another nursery that went out of business. The original price is $700 but she said she would give it to me for $300

    My question is what is too big for a pot? I’ve read that some get too big, but I’ve also heard you can grow any JM in a pot. Are there any disadvantages to this if the soil mixture and everything else check out? I have a very large custom made box on wheels that I wish to put this in.

    I do not want to have to dig this out of the ground for any reason, so I prefer keeping it the size it is with pruning and keeping it mobile, even if it is extremely heavy.

    Thank you
     
  2. AlainK

    AlainK Well-Known Member Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    If done carefully and at the right time, pruning both the roots and the tree itself will keep it reasonably small: that's actually what is done for bonsai.

    As far as I know, repotting is best done just befor budbreak, and roots can be pruned rather drastically - that's what I do for my bonsai. A free-draining, slightly acidic mix is recommended.

    Pruning trees in the ground is a technique used mainly for conifers (niwaki).
     
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  3. 0soyoung

    0soyoung Member

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    Repotting a tree that size can get to be a bit of a problem. I use a keyhole saw and literally saw around the perimeter a few inches inside the pot, then dig out what I cut loose and replace it with fresh soil, never needing to lift the tree out of the pot. As @AlainK said, spring 'as buds swell' is generally the best time to do this.

    IMHO, the signs of repotting/root-pruning being needed are
    • soil not draining
    • tree appears to be declining or 'getting sickly'
    Letting the tree otherwise become pot-bound will slow its growth, which is something you want in this case. IOW, leave it be until you see one or both of the warning signs.
     
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  4. Dsm1gb

    Dsm1gb Member

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    47676286-2BA5-4D0D-B106-17D561C36A1F.jpeg Here is a pic...
     

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