Potted fruit & veggie in South Ontario

Discussion in 'Fruit and Vegetable Gardening' started by fruitlover, Sep 6, 2004.

  1. fruitlover

    fruitlover Member

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    I am living in an apartment in South Ontario. My balcony is facing East and have strong light but only direct Sunshine from about noon to 3.

    I am thinking to plant some potted fruit and veggie on my balcony but with no clue which type is more suitable and when to start.

    I personally like berries, grape and leafy veggies. As an amateur, I am ready to listen to any suggestion.

    Thanks a lot for the help.
     
  2. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hey Fruitlover, I am just reading over the forums and noticed your post had not been replied to. Interesting question - what food plants can be grown in pots in limited space? I assume you are planning for next spring. Depending on how much space you have, I think some of the really small dwarf fruit trees could be grown. I don't know about grapes in a pot...maybe? Dwarf blueberries can be grown in pots. Currents or gooseberries might be nice.

    As far as veggies, I think you could try growing a lot of different garden plants in pots. tomatoes are easy. Greens and herbs are very rewarding in a small space. Vines like peas and beans can be trellised to increase yield in a small space. Strawberries also do well in pots.

    If you like berries you may want to try Physalis angulata or P. peruviana, common names, ground cherry, cape gooseberry or golden berry. They are related to tomatoes and can be grown in similar conditions. They look like tomatillos but have a sweet-tangy exotic flavour. They were one of the favourites in my garden this past year. I think they are underrated and should be grown more. Research on P. angulata has also indicated health benefits. The plant is grown as a medincinal plant in many tropical areas. Interesting Link

    I am sure there are many possibilities. Just consider space requirements when you are looking at plants you want.
     
  3. fruitlover

    fruitlover Member

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    Thanks a lot Eric.

    I lost the hope to get answer for my question after post it for one month. Totally by chance, I just come back to check it today and thrilled to get your detailed reply.

    Thank you very much.
     
  4. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hey unregistered guest,

    I have noticed several unregistered posts linking to the Home Orchard Society, a nice source of information on fruit growing. I am assuming these might be yours? I would like to invite you to join the forums. There are many benefits to being a forum member. It allows you to see forums reserved for members, to add attachments to your posts and your posts are not delayed by moderation. Perhaps the best reason to join is to become part of our online commmunity. Being a member adds an element of credence to your contributions.

    So this is an invitation to all unregistered guests, please take a moment to register. Just go to the top of the Forums and follow the registration prompts.
     
  5. Thean

    Thean Active Member 10 Years

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    Howdy Fruitlover,
    Before you start with your project, you should check how strong or rather how much weight can your balcony take. You can put excessive strain on balcony if you put in too many pots. Breaking your balcony is not a nice introduction to growing food on balcony.
    Eric gave you some very good suggestions. Yes, Gooseberries, Currants (red, white and black) are good candidates. You must try day neutral strawberries. I like Tristar and Seascap varieties. Down side is once you have tasted your home grown, you might not want to buy another strawberry from the store again. If you like rhubarb, give it a try too.
    Since you do not get lots of light, I would suggest that you grow leafy vegetables as opposed to fruit or root vegetables. Another suggestion is to grow those that you can 'cut and come again' types. You will be surprised how many leafy vegetables fall into this category. Lettuce, celtuce, mizuna, mibuna, kai lan (Chinese broccoli), Swiss chard are some to start off.
    Peace
    Thean
     

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