Pomegranate

Discussion in 'Fruit and Nut Trees' started by soccerdad, Sep 4, 2007.

  1. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    I was in Montreal last weekend and saw some very pretty pomegranate plants - about 5' tall - in the botanical garden there. I see that they take several years to flower, so I'd rather buy a small plant than buy seeds. Does anyone know where one could be bought in the lower mainland, or by mail in Canada?
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Were these growing inside the conservatory? We've only been able to keep a dwarf-formed one alive outside (and I'm not sure if it survived last winter).

    It looks like Flora Exotica carries some plants - that's not a recommendation, though, as I've never dealt with the company. Do your due research on the vendor. You can also find others with a search for [GOOGLE]punica granatum indoor site:ca[/GOOGLE]
     
  3. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    They were growing outside by the bonsai section of the Chinese Garden. I did not ask if they are taken inside for the winter there, but will check - they are pretty good at answering questions via e-mail.
     
  4. pierrot

    pierrot Active Member 10 Years

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    Hello

    There is an Italian gardener in Burnaby that has a fruiting and flowering pomegranate in Burnaby (amongst a lot of other things that are not supposed to grow here in canada!!). Iy is in a very sheltered area and this year had a lot of flowers but I doub't we will get enough hot weather to make them ripen.

    the plant is up against a brick wall against the house out of the wind and rain and is approximately 3m tall.

    if you can shelter ie that way you may have success like this.
     
  5. cgjedi

    cgjedi Active Member

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    I was just at Port Kells Nursery in Surrey and they have Pomegranate "Wonderful" 5 gal shrubs there.
     
  6. islandweaver

    islandweaver Active Member

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    I purchased a very small pomegranate last spring by mail order. It was only about six inches high with only two branches. After spending it's summer with me, still in a pot, it has grown into a nice rounded bush about 16" high and wide. I intend to leave it outside this winter, under our eaves to protect it from getting drowned, but next spring it is going into the ground.

    There is a pretty nice micro-climate in my yard as it is on the ocean but in a very protected little bay. My coldest temperature in 10 years has been -5 C. So I'm not taking too much of a risk with leaving it outside. Hopefully it will do well in our climate and bear fruit as I love pomegranates. I believe mine is also "Wonderful". Let's hope it is.

    Diane
     
  7. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks folks

    I actually got a dwarf pomegranate - "nana" - about 2' tall at Tropic to Tropic plants in Tsawassen a week ago. It was in bloom - is losing some of the blooms now - and looks promising.
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Pomegranate plants have been grown for years outdoors in Seattle, although it appeared many older ones were done in by the record winter of 1990. Last time (this past August) I was at the Hulda Klager Lilac Garden, Woodland, WA I was interested to see an old clump of the pomegranate cultivar with the doulbe, orange-and-white flowers growing in the ground, south of the house. Winters would be expected to be colder there than inside Seattle (temperature range at U.W. (Montlake) weather station 10F-103F) but warmer summers might provide compensatory hardening of growth.

    Montreal is definitely much too cold for these to overwinter outdoors.
     
  9. pinenut

    pinenut Active Member 10 Years

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    Several years to flower? Mine sure didn't. I'm pretty sure it was the first year. Try getting one from the grocery store, and dry the seeds, or spit them into a pot.
    Carl
     
  10. Gardenlover

    Gardenlover Active Member

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    what zone does pomegranate need minimum?
     
  11. islandweaver

    islandweaver Active Member

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    Gardenlover -

    I believe that you need a minimum Zone 7, more comfortably a 7B or 8. Apparently the old USSR was working at developing cold tolerant pomegranates that would grow within their union of countries and they did succeed. There is some literature on the web about their efforts with perhaps more information about the zones they were working within. Islandweaver
     
  12. Gardenlover

    Gardenlover Active Member

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    hmmmm?????

    my grandfather has some land in greece higher altitude...excellent soil no stones at all and deep red. Many years ago this land was an excellent vineyard..but people died, others moved to cities and occupied themselves with other work. So there is a huge amount of land...good soil just sitting there doing nothing. Pomegranates are in big demand there and you get a $$$bonus grant from the EU for growing them

    It will be a good idea to plant pomegranates...they need little water not huge amounts to keep thriving. Zone 7 is about -10 degrees celcius as lowest temp?
     
  13. Mohit

    Mohit New Member

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    Hi I was going through pomegranate thread & noticed that you bought it from port kell, So curious to know that did your plant survived winters as I'm looking forward to buy one from them.
     
  14. jacob collens

    jacob collens New Member

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    I've done a fair bit of research on cold hardy pomegranates and have narrowed my search down to the cold hardy 'russian' varieties. 'salavatski' seems to be the most cold hardy and 'parfyanka' not far behind but likely has better fresh eating seeds. I've been able to find two places in Canada with cold hardy Pomegranates.
    Pomegranates has both varieties I'm looking for and http://www.tropic.ca/ which just has a generic 'hardy russian' which is likely a salavatski but not sure. Shipping is pricy from the tropicofcanada out east and tropic.ca is out of stock this year.
     
  15. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor

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    I bought a pomegranate from Phoenix Perennials in Richmond about 5 years ago, Punica Granatum (possibly 'Salavatski' but I'm not sure of the cultivar as I lost the tag). It's now about 8ft tall and flowered for the first time last year.

    Punica granatum - pomegranate.JPG
     
  16. Paul B

    Paul B New Member

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    We have a pomegranate in our yard here in the Cowichan. It was about 4 feet tall when we bought the property four years ago. It is now about 12 to 15 ft tall, flowers all summer, and last rear produced about 30 pomegranates. The fruit turns red, but really doesn’t fully ripen as early autumn chill and rain end the ripening.
     
  17. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I'd bet with longer summer conditions, you'll eventually get some that are edible. Interesting!
     
  18. Sulev

    Sulev Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone has managed to get ripe fruits from home grown pomegranate tree/bush in Canada? What month these fruits can be harvested?
    Usually I would not expect to grow pomegranate in my country, because our winters are way too long, dark and cold, but this winter we had minimum -11°C and for few days only, so an idea to grow a pomegranate does not sound so crazy any more.
     
  19. SoCal2warm

    SoCal2warm Member

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    In Olympia, WA, (zone 8a), have two small pomegranate plants in the ground that have survived for several years, including a significantly colder than normal winter. They are not normal varieties, however, they are slightly hardier varieties, Parfianka and Crimson Sky, kind of rarer and harder to find.
    They seem to be slow growing though, but might grow faster when they get some size.

    I didn't want to experiment with a regular pomegranate variety because some reading research I did suggested regular pomegranates can grow here but may get killed back to the ground during a colder than normal winter that comes along about every 4 or 5 years.
     
  20. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor

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    I did get fruit from my tree for the first time last Fall (2020) - full sized fruit, but it didn't have quite enough time to fully ripen...maybe this year.
     
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  21. SoCal2warm

    SoCal2warm Member

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    If the tree is given several years to get to a much bigger size, the fruits might begin ripening a little earlier in the year.
     
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  22. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Based on personal observation pomegranates growing in the Puget Sound climate are mostly if not exclusively killed down only by the worst winters such as in 1990 which was said at the time to be the coldest in 30 years. With a percentage of these apparently coming back from stumps or roots even after that episode. Otherwise the 'Nana' cultivar seems to be pretty prevalent at local independent outlets and those presenting displays of novelty fruit plants tend to have pomegranate cultivars selected for fruiting characteristics also. For instance recently I was able to buy one of these for a neighbor of mine from a retailer in Bellevue. With a label on it that said it was known to fruit under local conditions. Not that I haven't seen western WA pomegranate plants with fruit on them many times in the past - the key to their culture here seems to be locating them near sunny walls.
     
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  23. RuthMcAll

    RuthMcAll New Member

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