podocarpus (Buddhist pine)

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by pearlshirl, May 27, 2005.

  1. pearlshirl

    pearlshirl Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Nanaimo,BC,Canada
    A while ago I posted a question about a patio tree that I have which I thought was an Austrailian Pine. I recently took a branch to the nursery and they have informed me that this tree is a "Podocarpus or Buddhist Pine" and is strictly an indoor plant. I informed them that I have the tree in a large outdoor pot and it has been outside for ten years. However this spring the leaves are starting to turn yellow, then brown and then drop off. Can anyone tell me if it is okay to leave the tree outside as it is about eight feet high and also if I plant it in a larger container and feed it 20-20-20(as suggested by the nursery) if this may solve the problem of the leaves turning yellow and dropping.I also can't seem to find a picture or any information on the internet on this plant.Also the tree gets sun until about 5:00PM in summer and is protected by a pine tree which is about fifty feet high.

    A puzzled gardener
    Pearshirl
     
  2. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,495
    Likes Received:
    205
    Location:
    Vancouver
  3. Dear Eric,

    Thank you for your prompt answer to my questions about my Podocarpus. I'm so happy that I found someone who could help me find information on it. Now I can repot it and give it some fertilizer and TLC and watch it return to a healthy looking speciman.

    Thanks again
    Pearlshirl
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,646
    Likes Received:
    528
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Why you cannot find "Podocarpus" on the internet I can't say, with 90-100 species, many of them cultivated, there is plenty of information online. Buddhist pine is one of the common names of P. macrophyllus, not difficult to find in nurseries down here. This is an outdoor plant in our region, when planted in the ground. Native to the hot summers and fertile soils of China and Japan, it can become quite pale here. Good soil in a warm position should produce the best results. One at the University of Washington, Seattle had cones recently, borne at eye level (the tree is in a planter in an underground parking garage, from which it pokes up through an opening into the light) where they were quite noticeable.

    If the planter is filled with actual soil, rather than potting mix you might like to send a sample to a soils lab for analysis. 20-20-20 is pretty strong, favored by those who are growing plants in heavily watered, mostly organic (soilless) potting mixes that may rapidly become quite leached if not liberally fertilized. Your situation may call for a different fertilizer.
     
  5. mchugh

    mchugh Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Nanaimo, BC Canada
    I found your post of more than a year ago when I was searching for info on buddhist pine. I recognized the small seedlings I have just bought as similar to a podocarpus that I had a few years ago. That tree was potted and I would have to cut it when it got greater than 8 - 10 feet. I was living in Toronto and sent the tree by plane to friends on Mayne Island and it was planted on their farm. Unfortunately, the tree succumbed after a winter and from deer who took a liking to scratch their heads on it. Now I am refreshed on the subject and will try my plants both indoors and outdoors (sheltered) in Nanaimo. The Xora that I sent at the same time has survived!

    I searched some the UBC posts mentioned and one suggested that the tree likes slightly acidic soil and will have yellow needles if the soil becomes alkaline.

    I have seen very large podocarpus trees in Equador including a park named after them.
     
  6. Rima

    Rima Active Member

    Messages:
    991
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Eastern Canada
    If podos are planted there with maybe some protection of established other trees, they should be o.k., but don't like staying wet at all, which is why it's yellowing. They need very good drainage. Why that other one died could have many reasons, maybe even having not been acclimated slowly enough to outdoors at the time.
     

Share This Page