Please tell me what kind of tree this is.

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by calees, May 22, 2012.

  1. calees

    calees Member

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    Can someone tell me what kind of tree this is? I guess maybe a crab apple but I'm not sure. I'd like to get one the same so I need the name.

    tree2opt.jpg
    The branches arch out at weird angles.
    treeopt.jpg
    Berries or fruits appear in the fall and are red.
    tree-trunkopt.jpg
    This is the trunk
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Cotoneaster sp.
     
  3. calees

    calees Member

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    Well thank you, that is somewhere to start. But, there are so many kinds of Cotoneaster and I can't find a photo that has branches sticking up and out like this one.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Actually the arching growth is rather characteristic of the genus.
     
  5. calees

    calees Member

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    "My tree" has a trunk though. And all the photos I find on google don't have a visible trunk (ie. they are more bushy or shrubby than tree-like). I do believe you...I just need to narrow it down to the species so I can try to buy one just like it. It is the coolest looking tree. Thanks for your help.
     
  6. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    If you google for "cotoneaster tree", the most frequent selection is Cotoneaster cornubia - probably what they usually sell.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Apart from kinds that are naturally arborescent tree shapes are produced from otherwise shrubby types by growers using grafting and training. I once saw and measured a grafted Franchet cotoneaster on the Washington coast that was something like 18' across. If I remember correctly the trunk and roots consisted of mountain ash (Sorbus). Naturally tree-like forms big enough to sit under are present in Seattle and Vancouver plantings. However these usually produce large leaves, yours looks like it is a shrubby one that was made into a tree by cultivation practices.
     

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