please identify my orchids

Discussion in 'Orchidaceae (orchids)' started by rubyrose, Jul 23, 2007.

  1. rubyrose

    rubyrose Member

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    please help me name these orchids all i know is that they are vandas and dedndrobiums thats all please help.... Thanks. And i want to know where is the best place to put them I live in the Philippines its a tropical country no winter or fall just summer and rainy season so i just put them in my garden....
     

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  2. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Most appear to be Dendrobium hybrids. The last one is a vandaceous orchid but also is likely to be a hybrid. A few of them don't show the leaves of the plant well enough to be certain but the flowers appear to be from a Dendrobium. The cane showing in most of your photos is common to the Dendrobium tribe. The leaves in the last one are without a doubt a vanda. That type of leaf is known as a "strap leaf".

    As for the names, you'd almost have to have the tags. Orchids sold in the US are almost totally hybridized variations. It is rare you'll find species orchids available. Does happen, but not all that often. The majority sold, especially in discount stores and nurseries are known as mericlones. A mericlone is a technical name for an orchid that has been cloned in a lab somewhere. The lab took a tiny piece of a leaf and created a "tissue culture". It is done all the time to cut time off the lengthy period required to grow them from seed. A mericloned orchid can cut several years off the growth time.

    Hybridizers often "mix and match" species in order to create something "new". As a result, if you don't know the parentage (which will be on the tag) you'll likely never figure it out. There are far too many orchid hybrids that look alike with only tiny variations. But unless you have a tag that specifically says these are "species", they are almost certainly hybridized variations.

    Interestingly, hybrids are something man does. Nature has unique mechanisms in place to prevent hybrids from forming in the wild.
     
  3. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    I posted this but it disappeared!

    All but the last appear to be from the Dendrobium tribe. The last one is a Vanda. You can tell the Dendrobium tribe by the "cane" common to the group. Vanda orchids often have the strap leaves seen in your last photo. A few don't show the leaves which is key to discerning the tribe.

    As for the "name"? Almost impossible to tell for certain. With only a few exceptions, orchids sold in the US are mericlones. A mericlone is simply an orchid grown from "tissue culture". A lab takes a piece of the leaf of a plant and creates thousands of baby plants in a test tube. That cuts off several years of growing time thus making them less expensive to grow.

    Your's are almost certainly hybrid variations. A hybrid is created by a grower by combining two or more species. These therefore would not likely be species orchids. The grower takes flower "A" and combines the pollen with flower "B" in hopes of creating something unique. But if you don't have the tag with the parentage it will be nearly impossible to figure out. Too many hybrids look almost exactly alike.

    Species orchids are rarely sold in the US. Does happen, but it is not common and they are often expensive. And interestingly, nature has a unique way of preventing hybrids in the wild. Hybrid orchids are something man creates. Nature does not appear to like them!
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    No, it's because the original poster made duplicate threads, and you responded to both. I've merged the threads.
     
  5. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Daniel! That threw me for a loop!
     
  6. rubyrose

    rubyrose Member

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    Thanks for the info... The last two are from the vanda family since both their leaves are the same.... I put them in a driftwood and its in the southwest portion of my garden and receive sun all day.... I water them daily. And the first six are all dendrobiums and i put them in the northwest side of my garden and they are partially shaded with a net... Am i growing them right?
     
  7. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Vandas do like brighter light but be careful not to hit them with direct hot sunlight. A few species will tolerate direct sun, but many will not. The best option is bright indirect light. It sounds like you're doing the right thing with the dendrobiums. They also like brighter light, but not as bright as vandas (in general). Every rule has species which defy it so some do better in brighter light than others.

    If you are watering daily, I applaud you! I recommend that to people all the time and few wish to take the time. As you appear to have already figured out, these are rain forest plants. They love rain!

    There are some good discussions on this board about orchids. One grower from the Philippines who uses the screen name Everlasting knows her stuff! I suggest you look up those posts from the search engine.

    Hope you have lots of blooms!
     
  8. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    It just dawned on me you are in the Phillipines. That could easily mean your orchids could be true species (rather than hybrids) since both would be more common in your region of the world. You are fortunate to be able to have these beautiful plants found naturally in your "back yard". If you have access to someone who knows the species of your country you may be able to learn their exact heritage. "Everlasting" is from your country as well, you might send a private note to her and see if she has any information. She is quite familiar with orchid care and very knowledgeable.
     
  9. everlasting

    everlasting Active Member

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    Hi rubyrose! Everlasting here. Yeah the last 2 are vandas and if acclimatized can withstand full sun in the morning. Rubyrose's place is cooler than my place which is in the metropolis. Dendros are the easiest to care and will give flowers every 7 months. I stay away from liquid fertilizers so that my orchids will stay with me for a long time. The best vandas that I took care of are the local varieties which have smaller flowers but with very fragrant scent.

    You seemed to have a collection of dendros, even the collector's mini dendros. Mine are placed higher so that my dogs can't eat it!

    To photopro: Most orchids sold in our nurseries are from tissue culture or cloned ones unless she bought it in an orchidarium that sells orchids from forests. I will not be surprised if it came from thailand! Mostly, orchids from our forests are not the types as shown by rubyrose. They are rarer, more fragrant and some have smaller flowers.
     
  10. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    And I'd love to get some of your native species in my own collection! Thanks for the additional information.
     

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