please ID

Discussion in 'Cacti and Succulents' started by hailey530, Jun 18, 2008.

  1. hailey530

    hailey530 Member

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    Does anyone have any idea what type of cacti this is? Will it flower?
    Thanks in advance.
     

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  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Something in the family Aizoaceae, related to Lithops and other similar genera (i.e., not a cactus).

    It should flower given the right care and growing conditions.
     
  3. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    It looks like some type of Haworthia.
     
  4. edleigh7

    edleigh7 Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking that initially, also Bluewing. I know I have a name in my Cactus & Succulent book at home, but I am at work now ; )
    I will take a peek later. "Window plant" keeps popping in my head as a common name for some reason, but I googled and came up with a different Haworthia...

    Ed
     
  5. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    It looks a little like H. Retusa, but that one doesn't looks as flat as the one in the photo here, but it does have the stripes in the leaves. Maybe a haworthia hybrid? Did you get your book out yet Ed?
     
  6. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    Haworthia bayeri???
     
  7. hailey530

    hailey530 Member

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    That's it Bluewing! Hawothia bayeri. I just googled it and found plenty of pictures of it, stripes and all. Thank you!! Now I'll know how to better care for it.
     
  8. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    Good! Haworthias of all types are great succulents!
     
  9. edleigh7

    edleigh7 Well-Known Member

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    Well done Bluewing!!

    Ed
     
  10. Cereusly Steve

    Cereusly Steve Active Member

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    Sorry no cigar. Its definitely not Haworthia bayeri.

    Its the very common Haworthia muticata.
     
  11. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    Can you post a photo of Haworthia muticata to compare?
     
  12. edleigh7

    edleigh7 Well-Known Member

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    I can't find anything on H muticata, is there a typo or can you give a link Steve...

    Ed
     
  13. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Tried the obvious muricata but there's no H. muricata either.
     
  14. edleigh7

    edleigh7 Well-Known Member

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    Me too, same result
     
  15. hailey530

    hailey530 Member

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    Here's a link I found for the haworthia bayeri:
    http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/174796/

    it looks exactly like my plant with the triangular leaves and stripes in them. Has anyone found a link to the Haworthia muricata?

    Since I don't know anything about either of these I'm eager to learn.

    Cereusly Steve what did you see that makes you think it's not h. bayeri?
     
  16. Bambi

    Bambi Active Member

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    It looks kind of like this one, Haworthia emelyae var. multifolia:

    http://flickr.com/photos/_mm_/228468845/

    I think Steve meant Haworthia mutica? Could also be Haworthia retusa?

    I'm guessing it's one of those two...or one of the many ssp....
     
  17. hailey530

    hailey530 Member

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    Forgive my lack of experience, but what is the difference between the two? They both look very similar.
     
  18. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    Hailey,
    Since there are some haworthia's like yours that resemble each other with maybe some slight differences, it is possible to get a good clear close-up of your leaves.

    I don't think it's retusa...

    If you look real close at the leaves of Haworthia emelyae var. multifolia from the link above, you'll notice small serrated edges.

    Close-up of Haworthia mutica's leaves.
    http://www.huntington.org/BotanicalDiv/ISI2005/pix/isi2005-25.jpg


    If you compare them to your Haworthia, maybe you'll be able to see what you have more clearly.
     
  19. hailey530

    hailey530 Member

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    The edges aren't serrated, completely smooth.
    Here are the best up close photos I can get without it getting blurry.
     

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  20. Cereusly Steve

    Cereusly Steve Active Member

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    It was a typo.

    The correct name is Haworthia mutica.

    A Google search will turn up tons of pix of this very common species.

    Would have corrected it myself but big brother is screening my postings and I can't make any changes.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 20, 2008
  21. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    The photo linked above in my post is of H. mutica which has smooth leaves all around. Hailey, your Haworthia has small what looks like serrated edges in your new posted photos, no?:)
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2008
  22. hailey530

    hailey530 Member

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    I know your right. At first glance I thought it was smooth (the tops are), and looking at it again, I see the serrated edges. So does that make it a Haworthia emelyae var. multifolia?
    I have it in a pot with a few other cacti, do you think it will spread throughout the pot?
    Thanks for all the help identifying it.
     
  23. cjjulian

    cjjulian Active Member

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    I always that it was Haworthia cuspidata. no matter what it is, I love that plant its one of my favorite in my collection.
     
  24. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    Your haworthia does look like the link Bambi posted, Haworthia emelyae var. multifolia, a hybrid. Looking at a few photos of what cjjulian posted, yours looks like that one too! 'Haworthia cuspidata'

    Which one??? Well, take a look at the two links below and see what you think. At least you know it's a haworthia:)
    Most Haworthias will eventually offset or spread out which might take a few years to really fill in a pot.

    Haworthia emelyae var. multifolia-
    http://flickr.com/photos/_mm_/228468845/


    Haworthia cuspidata-
    http://farm1.static.flickr.com/97/259705691_1dfb96fdf1.jpg?v=0
     
  25. Cereusly Steve

    Cereusly Steve Active Member

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    Had to dig out my Haworthia books.

    Haworthia mirabilis var. mundula is best match.

    Contrary to what was claimed, you can plainly see small teeth along the leaf margins.

    Haworthia retusa is bigger.

    Definitely not H. bayeri.

    Haworthia emelyae var. multifolia is not a hybrid and its not the plant.

    It does not look like H. cuspidata (an old hybrid between H. retusa and H. cymbiformis) either. The leaves of the hybrid are not retused.
     

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