Please help to identify!

Discussion in 'Cacti and Succulents' started by goldenneli, Mar 30, 2007.

  1. goldenneli

    goldenneli Member

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    Hi everybody!
    A few moths ago I fell in love with a kind of succulent "rose" my brother had in his patio, and I asked him to give me an off-set whenever it became available, but it never happened, I did like that plant so much that I went through all the garden centers around looking for it, but had no luck. I then asked my brother its name to try to buy it online, but he didn´t know.
    I´ve been searching thousands of pictures on the internet and I´ve been unable to identify it´s name. To me it looks like an echeveria, but none of the ones if seen on the internet (believe me, I´ve seen thousands) looks like that one.
    I´ll show you a few pictures and ask you for some help, because I really like it, but no idea what´s it´s name.

    Please note the actual size of the plant is about 40cm height and about 30cms wide
     

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  2. goldenneli

    goldenneli Member

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    I forgot to say that my brother also told me that it many times has had small flowers on the stem (which is chunky, about 4 cm diameter). As you can see, it looks now like its gonna have an off-set soon, could anyone kindly explain how to plant it, and also if the little flowers you get on the stem are also valid to propagate?
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  4. goldenneli

    goldenneli Member

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    Thanks for your help, but I´m not quite sure, because the leaves of my brothers plant look much thicker, like the echeverias I´ve seen on the internet, or might it just be because my brothers plant is older than the one on the link you´ve just posted?
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Maybe due to growing conditions? A plant in bright sun outdoors would develop thicker leaves than one grown in a glasshouse. Or maybe a different species of Aeonium? Or I could be wrong and it is an Echeveria - I was mainly suggesting a different (though related) genus because you thought you may have eliminated Echeveria from the possibles.
     
  6. goldenneli

    goldenneli Member

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    Well, I´ve been looking through aeoniums right now, and the stem definetly looks like the one I´m talking about, and on top of that, it would make sense when we talk about the small flowers that it sometimes get on the stem, by the way, can I use one of those to propagate? and if so, how do you recommend to do it?
     
  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I don't know about the flower stems, but your second pic shows it is developing a side branch, which you should be able to use as a cutting later, when it is a bit larger.
     
  8. Wask

    Wask Active Member

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    Definitely an Echeveria. Echeverias often grow on short stems as in your pic. In pic 2 it looks to be making an inflorescence... check this pic, I don't think it is yours but very similar.

    http://www.echeveriasinoz.com/pics/capri.jpg
     
  9. TonyR

    TonyR Active Member

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    It is very similar to an Echeveria I have known for a long time and which is very easy to grow in our climate. I believe it is an old hybrid, E. x imbricata. Here's a pic I took in early summer last year. Apart from this bit of old rockery, it spreads over a low area of a concrete driveway, trapping leaves and soil under its rosettes, which give it all the nutrition it needs.

    And you don't need to wait for offsets to get new plants. Just break off a leaf or two and let them sit in the pot with the broken end resting on the soil. Within a few months small plantlets will sprout from their bases.
     

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  10. goldenneli

    goldenneli Member

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    Than you so much!
    So you definetly think its an echeveria? That's what I thought at the beggining as for it's thick leaves it would suggest an echeveria, but as I started looking through the internet pictures of echeverias, none of the pics I saw was similar to the one I'm talking about.
    Any additional knowlege on this plant will be highly appreciated!!!
    Thank you all very very much :)
     
  11. Rosemarie

    Rosemarie Active Member

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    I'm too late, because Tony has already ID'd it for you, but I'll 2nd that...I believe it's Echeveria 'Imbricata' as well. :)
     

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