Please help me identify what is damaging my roses!

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by IslandJazz, Jun 3, 2023.

  1. IslandJazz

    IslandJazz Member

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    Hello! I am a newbie trying to cultivate roses. Unfortunately two out of my three roses are being eaten by something (or is this disease?). I've tried spraying them with horticultural oil in the evenings, soaking both sides of the leaves in case the the damage is being done by damselfly larvae, but I don't think that is doing the trick. Any suggestions? I've attached a photo for reference.

    Thanks!
     

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  2. Sulev

    Sulev Contributor

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    Looks like a Rose Mosaic (cluster of viruses). You can't fight it with oil.
     
  3. IslandJazz

    IslandJazz Member

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    Oh! That sounds awful. Is there some way to fight it?
     
  4. Sulev

    Sulev Contributor

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    I may be wrong about the diagnose. I haven't seen, how the damage looked like in early stages. Google Rose Mosaic virus and compare images with what you have seen on your roses. There should be information also, how to treat this, if the diagnose is confirmed. But do not rush with confirmation, I'm not an expert on rose diseases.
     
  5. IslandJazz

    IslandJazz Member

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    Yeah, I just looked it up and I don’t really think that’s the problem. The roses actually bloom just fine, it’s just the foliage that looks lousy.
     
  6. Sulev

    Sulev Contributor

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  7. IslandJazz

    IslandJazz Member

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    Thanks! The leaves seem to look different. They don’t have the mottled light yellow appearance at any point as I recall. They get spotty and then skeletal. The flowers are not affected.
     
  8. DerekK

    DerekK Active Member

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    Your leaves look as if they have been eaten by an insect and likely Sawflies. Good info on control and treatment in link below. I think when you use any product to control them timing is everything. If the larvae are not on the plant at the time of spraying it won't be effective. I would start by removing any damaged leaves and generally cleaning up around the plant and then keep an eye out for any further damage and then spray. Perhaps a light application of a rose fertilizer could also help the plant regrow new foliage. Good luck. I don't think it is a terminal situation.

    rose-and-pear-slugs-sawflies
     
  9. IslandJazz

    IslandJazz Member

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    Thank you so much Derek! That’s kind of what I was thinking, but I wasn’t sure if I should remove all of the affected leaves. Now I know! I have something called “horticultural oil” which I’ve diluted as per the instructions and sprayed in the cool hours. I see others recommend neem oil. Are they the same or is one better than the other?
     
  10. IslandJazz

    IslandJazz Member

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    Also, do you know anything about lilacs? I’ve got something eating/harming my leaves on otherwise healthy trees. I’ve asked for help with this on a separate thread, but so far no response. I’ll attach a picture, just in case. Thanks again!
     

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  11. DerekK

    DerekK Active Member

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    I have used horticultural oil in the past but generally I don't spray for anything. I find that spraying of anything should be avoided except in a more urgent scenario. For most diseases and insect damage it is better to practice good general garden hygiene (clean up infected leaves, prune for airflow, etc) and other organic or natural methods. As mentioned I wouldn't spray unless you are sure the larvae are active on the plant. Otherwise you don't hit the target and just end up wasting the product you are using.

    Check your lilac post for reply.
     
  12. IslandJazz

    IslandJazz Member

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    Good to know. Thank you!
     

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