Please help me identify this house plant

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by bssunil74, Feb 28, 2010.

  1. bssunil74

    bssunil74 Member

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    Hi,

    I bought these house plants a week back. Lately their leaves are turning yellow and falling off. Not sure what could be the cause. So, can someone let me know the following?

    1. What is the name of the plant?
    2. Why are the leaves turning yellow?

    The plants are always inside my home. I read that too much watering could be the cause so I have not watered it since last 5 days. Assuming that it did not have enough light I kept the pots outside early morning for an hour or so. But I want to be sure of the cause first before trying out a solution.

    Thanks and Regards,

    Sunil
     

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  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Looks like a species of Philodendron.
     
  3. bssunil74

    bssunil74 Member

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    Thanks a lot. Can you please tell me why are the leaves turning yellow and what should I do to avoid it?

    I did a little more search in the web and found that it is Philodendron Ceylon Gold.

    Thanks and Regards
    Sunil
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 1, 2010
  4. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Likely a Philodendron but without more detailed photos an ID is unlikely. To properly identify an aroid requires a closeup photo of both the top and bottom of the leaf, a closeup of the petiole that supports the blade with information on its shape (round, square, grooved, etc.), and photos of the stem which is the central axis or main support of the plant. Assuming this is a juvenile form of one of the 1000 or so species the shape can change dramatically as it grows. Aroids undergo both ontogeny (natural growth change) as well as variability based on where they are grown and collected in the wild.

    You can find the answers to the growth questions here: http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Grow or Growing Philodendrons.html

    And the answer to why it changes here: http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Natural variation within aroid and plant species.html

    This could be a form of Philodendron erubescens but without more detail I can't be certain. The unopened cataphyll and the leaf veins look right.
     
  5. Hartley Botanic

    Hartley Botanic Active Member

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    All I can think of is over/under watering, or if the plant has suffered some kind of knock or other type of damage that has caused this reaction...

    A mineral deficiency? You could try feeding it?
     
  6. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Not necessarily over or under watering. More likely improper soil mixture for a Philodendron. I explain that in detail in the article.
     
  7. bssunil74

    bssunil74 Member

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    Thanks a lot for all your help. Let me take Photopro's advice and implement it. I will post it here again in a weeks time and let you all know of the progress.

    Best Regards
    Sunil
     
  8. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Don't expect a sudden drastic change. It will take a month or two for the plant to begin to recover. Fast draining soil, adequate water, proper light conditions, adequate but not excess fertilizer along with a bit of magnesium will go a long way.
     
  9. bssunil74

    bssunil74 Member

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    I verified from the seller that the plant is Philodendron Ceylon. I kept it in my portico where there is good amount of light. The progress has been pretty good. Although there are some leaves partially turned brown, I think they are when I had kept them inside my home. There has been a lots of new and fresh green leaves sprouting.
     
  10. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    There are no Philodendron species found on the island of Ceylon. All Philodendron species are Neotropical which means they come from Central America, South America and the Caribbean. Ceylon is off the coast of India but the name of the nation is now Sri Lanka.

    I just checked every scientific database and there is no such species. Someone obviously made up a name to sell a hybrid plant so the name tells us nothing. Tons of sellers do this just so they can have a name to put on their product.

    The best you can do is follow the directions for caring for a Philodendron in my article link above..... bright light, fast draining soil kept evenly moist.
     
  11. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Do you see any reddish coloration on the petioles or stem of this plant? The petioles are the stalks that support the leaves and the stem is the central axis of the plant from which the petioles and roots grow.

    I just enlarged your photo and the shape of the blade at least resembles Philodendron erubescens. Typically that species has red either on the underside of the leaves or some of the plant parts. That species is from Central America and is often used to create hybrid specimens. It also is highly variable and can take on many colorations so my guess is someone selected a light colored sport of the plant and hybridized it into a stable form which has the very light yellow/green blades.

    Read this for more information:

    http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Natural variation within aroid and plant species.html
     
  12. bssunil74

    bssunil74 Member

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    I have just uploaded some of the latest photographs. You are right. There is no species with Philodendron Ceylon as its biological name. But a quick search in google and as told by the seller (in fact various other sellers), this plant is called Philodendron Ceylon Gold. I think the name is for selling purpose. I also saw some other names like Philodendron Black Cardinal. Yes, I read the articles and have been following it. I even read about the orchids since I have orchids "white" too and has stopped flowering lately but look healthy. Not sure why. The articles are pretty exhaustive. Thanks for the same.
     

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  13. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    My best guess is this plant was derived from the species known to science as Philodendron erubescens. It shows indications of being a hybrid with some other parentage but it would be impossible to determine what the total parentage might be without a DNA test which is far too costly.

    Just treat it like a Philo with good light and give it something to climb.
     

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