Please help ID this Rhodo and tree

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Justine M, Dec 19, 2009.

  1. Justine M

    Justine M Active Member

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    Hello Gardening Enthusiasts!

    Here are the two specimens I am wondering about.

    With the rhodo I only have the leaves (which are long); the plant is quite tall. I'm wondering if it's the big white type (King George?).

    Hopefully the distinctive trunk of the tree makes identification easy. Images are a wee bit blurry to add to the challenge.

    Thanks in advance for your great advice!

    Best regards,
    jm
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    There are many kinds of rhododendrons, with that long narrow leaf it might be R. calophytum or a hybrid of it - but more needs to be seen, including the flowers. And some rhododendrons around are unselected hybrid seedlings, without names.

    Likewise, really not enough of the tree is visible here to name it - unless somebody happens to recognize the type and get it right. But without additional views it could be hard to verify such an identification.
     
  3. Justine M

    Justine M Active Member

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    Both these plants were in Arthur Erickson's garden. Wish there was a book or directory of plants for the place! Don't know if I'll be able to see the rhodo in flower next spring due to my schedule, but I love those big rhodo trees and would like to have some in my garden. I will look up your guesses.
    Thanks, Justine
     
  4. SusanDunlap

    SusanDunlap Active Member

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    Rhododendron arboreum?
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    R. arboreum has shorter, narrower leaves that tend to point stiffly downward, on a more compact, conical (when young) specimen. Those not having matured and broadened are interesting for having clearly distinct apical dominance, in the manner of a conifer or a red alder tree. I have never seen this trait consistently demonstrated by any other rhododendrons grown here, including some quite tall-growing kinds.

    They had some fairly well along (for here) R. arboreum in the Lam Asian Garden at one time, but I may have noted during my last visit some years ago that these were gone. Most (but not all) forms are not hardy enough to persist in this area, except in the most favored, California-like sheltered waterfront properties. Occasional, coldest winters dip too low.
     
  6. SusanDunlap

    SusanDunlap Active Member

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  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Yes, it's an indumented species - unlike the one asked about. But I would not say the photo linked to shows obvious distinct characters of R. arboreum specifically, there are many other species with tomentum on the new growth and indumentum on the mature leaves. Perhaps the most valued of these in gardens is the compact-growing R. mettermichii yakusimanum. Recent hybrids derived from it have become prevalent at local outlets, may have quite a bit of its fuzz.
     
  8. Justine M

    Justine M Active Member

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    Here are a couple more images. Maybe they will be more helpful for the rhodo and the tree. Again, apologies for my out-of-focus photos. The camera was replaced after this trip to the garden. (Sigh)
     

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