Platanus X acerifolia (London Plane Tree)

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by Eunice, Oct 21, 2006.

  1. Eunice

    Eunice Member

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    On our street these 100 year old boulevard trees have lumpy trunks. None of them appearing on the Internet show trunks looking like that.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Burly trunks characteristic of P. acerifolia 'Pyramidalis'.
     
  3. Eunice

    Eunice Member

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    Thank you, Ron.

    Do you know if these trees are burled inside (like a maple) or is this just a thickness in the bark? There is no sign of any growth ever having happened at those places where the lumps appear.

    I tried dragging a picture onto this message but that doesn't seem to work. I am new at this.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Here's a similar example.

    Don't know what the wood would be like compared to that from other planes, you'd need to cut one down. As a general point, plane wood is supposed to be quite decorative.

    PS the earliest scientific name (1770) for the London Plane is Platanus × hispanica Muenchh.; P. × acerifolia (Ait.) Willd. is a later name (1789).
     

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  5. Eunice

    Eunice Member

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    Thank you for the picture - that is exactly what I mean.

    I really would like to find out the answer, but I guess cutting the trees down would be a little drastic. I am afraid that the City of Vancouver would be terribly upset if I cut down any of their 100 year old boulevard trees. They have quite a number of them in this area interspersed with Ulmus Americana, Acer macrophyllum, and Acer platanoides. Right now I would trade them all in for the blazing colours of the Norway maple, but I know I will soon be back appreciating the surprising colours of the London plane tree trunks.

    I am glad that they decided to change the name - "foliage like a maple" is so much easier to remember, and to pronounce.
     

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