Plants Identification / cactus

Discussion in 'Cacti and Succulents' started by interlude, Jan 26, 2007.

  1. interlude

    interlude Member

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    I know its a Mammillarias, but I want to know what kind it is .
     

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  2. interlude

    interlude Member

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    The one in flower . Flowers 11 mouths a year. And I sow some seeds from this plant, germination was very good 17 out 23 seeds are up in 5 days
     
  3. mandarin

    mandarin Active Member 10 Years

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    No. 2: M. prolifera
     
  4. interlude

    interlude Member

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    mandarin , I look up the name you give me and it looks like it is a {m. prolifera}, Thank you . Do you know what # one is? A good site on mammilliaila ,www.mammillarias.net/ do you know about more sites?
     
  5. mandarin

    mandarin Active Member 10 Years

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    No (I am mainly interested in other genera), but I will take a look in my Mammillaria book. I ususally hesitate to do that because of the large number of species in this genus, but I believe that the number of species that look like # 1 is relatively small.
     
  6. mandarin

    mandarin Active Member 10 Years

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    I'm not 100% sure, but I think #1 is a M. thornberi.
     
  7. interlude

    interlude Member

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    Thank you for your time . I may have the name, it may be a M.Sheldonii . I do know what you are talking about mammillaria it is a lot of them. I only have 10 or 15 mammillaria .
     
  8. mandarin

    mandarin Active Member 10 Years

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    M. sheldonii and M. thornberi belong to the same series (Ancistracanthae). Most of these species look similar (branching from the base, brown, hooked spines), but are difficult to grow, and seem to form groups rather than "mats" as in your picture. That is why I considered sheldonii and most other species from Ancistracanthae less likely. M. thornberi has smaller stems (especially the subspecies yaquensis) which form mats, and is much easier to grow. I guess you have not seen any flowers on your plant? It usually make identification much easier.

    How long/wide are the stems of your plant?
     
  9. interlude

    interlude Member

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    You are right Its Look more like the M. Thornberi , I have not seen the flower. What is the name of the book you got on Mammillaria and how can I find it. I want to Thank You for your time and help !!!
     
  10. mandarin

    mandarin Active Member 10 Years

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    Pilbeam, John (1999) Mammillaria. ISBN 0-9528302-8-0. About 375 pages, nothing but Mammillaria. Very good, except that only close-up photos are available for many species.

    Another book which is quite good for identification purposes is
    Preston-Mafham, R. & K. (1994) Cacti. The illustrated dictionary. ISBN 0-88192-400-8.
    Must be > 1000 pictures of different non-columnar cacti in this book. Many of the names are now obsolete, but that is not a major obstacle.

    Where to find? Well, I know that Pilbeam still sells his book , and in my own country SuccSeed has them, but I would be surprised if there isn't someone closer to you who offers them.
     
  11. interlude

    interlude Member

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    Thank you for all your help, I did find the books you are talking about in the USA Thank you, Bennie [ interlude ]
     

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