Plants between rocks of waterfall area - suggestions?

Discussion in 'Garden Design and Plant Suggestions' started by dwalli, Jul 19, 2009.

  1. dwalli

    dwalli Member

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    Location:
    Detroit, MI, USA
    Hello, UBC BGF members!

    I've just joined after being directed here by the folks at a local nursery, and I've been spending quite a bit of time in the Japanese Maples forums. I know I've barely scratched the surface of everything that's here. :)

    To get to my question - I've put in a pond and the beginnings of a Japanese-style garden behind my home. My filter system is a recirculating pump, bio-filter, and waterfall. The stones on either side of the falls are catching just enough spray to moisten the stones for 6" to 15" on either side. I'm wondering if this might be conducive to plant growth in the crevices between the stones. There's presently no soil between most of them; just empty space down to the EPDM liner.

    Any thoughts on plants that might find such an environment appealing?

    Thanks!
    Don
     
  2. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    London, Ontario, Canada (Zone 5b)
    If there's anyway you can show pics, this would be beneficial in suggestiong what might look good.

    A picture says a thousand words...

    : )
     
  3. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Victoria Australia [cool temperate]
    Ferns would be a choice here as that is what grows in the wild.

    Liz
     
  4. kaspian

    kaspian Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Maine coast, USA, zone 5
    Ferns are a great idea, but I wonder if you might also -- in addition to the ferns -- go for some contrasting leaf texture and color, as for instance with native (or non-native) sedges, which look like grasses but tend to form interesting seed heads and often take on nice coloring in late summer and autumn. (There are also variegated or yellow-leaved sedges which make an eye-catching feature in a shady place.) This kind of thing would suit a Japanese-style garden well, I think.

    Depending on what your immediate surroundings are like, you might find interesting stuff popping up of its own accord in a congenial spot like this -- a gift of birds or of the wind.
     
  5. dwalli

    dwalli Member

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    OK, specific pictures will have to wait for a bit, as I've discovered a small leak from the watercourse that has to be fixed - and that means a total teardown/rebuild. :(

    Liz, the pond is in full hot sun for most of the afternoon (the Detroit area is zone 5b/6, but the summer afternoon sun here can be quite hot) - are there ferns that aren't shade-loving that might work?
     
  6. The Hollyberry Lady

    The Hollyberry Lady New Member

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    Ugh! Hate leaks.

    : (
     
  7. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
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    Not sure about your area. My vision was a mossy glade. I have a pond below a bank and it is all shaded by a birch so sort of a mini climate and moss and ferns do well. We also have a lot of wild ferns in the gullies up in the forest that would all grow here as well but would need dappled.

    If it was open here like you describe I would have to xeriscape. Grasses and heat tolerant, and lots of mulch and rock spots to plant things against. Maybe there are some mediterrainian (sp) plants that would work and lichens on rocks..

    I am not sure of yr winter but I think you are cold. Might have to think about that end of the year rather than summer. Can I also suggest you have a look at possible sources of inspiration such as rockeries or natural water courses and see what grows there.

    Liz
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2009
  8. The Wanderer

    The Wanderer Member

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    Hope you get that leak sorted! As for plants, succulents are always a good bet as many don't need a lot of soil to form roots. Also, close to the waterfall, some types of grasses would look good - festuca (which is low growing) or pennisetum. Maybe look at armeria if you can get it. It looks a lot like ornamental garlic, but it's lower growing and form clumps.

    TW
     
  9. Greerish

    Greerish Active Member

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    Location:
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    you can grow moss on the rocks as long as it's constantly damp and then try growing somthing like some of the hardy carniverous plants like Drosera, Pinguicula, Utricularia, Sarracenia and maybe mix in some low growing sedges too

    thhis site might be helpfull in finding what'll survive your winters
    http://www.sarracenia.com/faq/faq5000.html

    hope you fix your leek soon
     

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