Planting roses

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by dandy, May 4, 2005.

  1. dandy

    dandy Member

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    I would like opinions on "bud unions" and whether to plant one inch above or one inch below the soil level.

    Yvonne
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Below, if you want a tender modern rose to survive a cold winter. Scions sitting up in the air, perched on a stock tend to freeze.
     
  3. PeninsularRose

    PeninsularRose Member

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    In Victoria, we have 194 rose bushes, all with exposed bud unions, and have never lost a rose to freezing in >10 years, including the famous Victoria Blizzard.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Last killer winter down here was in 1990.
     
  5. Puddleton

    Puddleton Active Member 10 Years

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    I agree with Ron,
    we plant level with the ground then mulch with lucerne straw during growing season and wheat/barley straw in winter. Saying that, its mid winter now in Sydney, 21c today and I'm looking out the window at masses of flowers on Duchess de Brabant. I buy bags of party ice to spread on iris, strawbs, calamagrostis etc through winter to improve flowering in spring and summer.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Problems seem to begin sometime below 10F, maybe 15F for more tender sorts. There are many other kinds of plants grown for long periods (decades) here that also fail when it gets that cold. With long-term warming predicted now Californian conditions (and plant selections) may be around for more than 20 or 30 years this time.
     
  7. Puddleton

    Puddleton Active Member 10 Years

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    12 years ago, I worked and further studied in England. I remember the freezing desicating winds were the culprits of most deaths in the garden, Stems would split open from the icey siberian winds. On those days, i left the plants to fend for themselves and take refuge in a pile of warm , composting oak leaves. The occasional fox and hedgehog would also try to join me also. Fond memories and very character building times
     
  8. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    I agree that it really depends on the variety of the rose that you are growing and how tender it is. I am in a colder end of Zone 8, warmer end of Zone 7. My philosophy is that I will grow the rose in a manner which makes it a more attractive garden plant, which is without the bud union (I call it the "ugly knee") showing. I routinely mulch with spent mushroom compost in early winter, more as a soil conditioner than for winter production. I reckon that those roses that don't come through any of our winters shouldn't have a place in my garden in the first place.
     
  9. Silver Flower

    Silver Flower Member

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    Hi Yvonne, Well, everyone has a little different to tell you.
    Because I live in Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada), and we are a zone 3, I ALWAYS plant my roses at least 3-4 inches below the knob. This way it does not freeze in our cold climate. I have been lucky this way. Living in BC, you of course must be a zone 6, therefore you will not have to plant that deep. Maybe 1" should be enough for you. Hope this helps you. Liz​
     

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