Planting Acer palmatum 'Tamukeyama'

Discussion in 'Maples' started by mjplax3, Mar 23, 2010.

  1. mjplax3

    mjplax3 Member

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    I recently purchased and planted my first Tamukeyama. My small planting bed is located in the front of my townhome and is west/southwest facing, therefore, it receives mid-afternoon sun.

    The bed contains about 3-4 inches of top soil, then some stone and clay underneath. Previously, there was a large pine planted in its location but died over the winter, some of the large roots from the pine remain in the clay layer. When I planted my Tamukeyama, about 3-4 inches of the root ball is above the top layer of soil. I mounded additional top soil on the root ball to cover.

    Am I doing everything correctly to ensure my maple will survive the transplant? Any suggestions?


    Thanks.
    Matt
     
  2. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Sounds OK. Is there good drainage there? If not, it may need to be a little higher (make the mound of soil bigger). Also, be sure to mulch heavily, but keep the mulch about 4" away from the trunk of the tree.
     
  3. mjplax3

    mjplax3 Member

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    Thanks for the help K4.

    There seems to be good drainage. Do you know if there are any issues if clay is found only 3-4 inches below top soil? I have not found any issues with that during my research. I am more concerned about having to dig it up and mix the clay with additional soil if there is an issue I am not aware of. I have not mulched yet but I will this weekend.

    I can't wait for my Tamukeyama to begin leafing out! I will attach some pictures soon.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2010
  4. cthenn

    cthenn Active Member

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    I picked up a decent one this weekend at Lowe's. Yeah, yeah, I know those are probably all pushed with fertilizer and have a less healthy root system, but hey, it was 20 bucks for a good size tree (probably 30" with a 1" trunk). I wanted something already pretty large to fill a gap in my landscape.
     
  5. mjplax3

    mjplax3 Member

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    cthenn

    Too bad you had to settle for Lowes but for 20 bucks, that is hard to pass up. I picked mine up from my local garden center, they have about 30 varietals currently and expect to have a few more before the buying season really picks up. Who knows, your Lowes bought maple might outgrow and outlive my garden center bought maple. I will post some illustrations when it starts leafing out.
     
  6. cthenn

    cthenn Active Member

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    I bought the plant on a whim. Normally I get all my plants from a good Maple nursery, but this was a nice size for a good price, so I thought I'd give it a try. If I bought this size from the nursery, it would have cost me 3 or 4 times that (but probably a better started, more healthy plant). We'll see what happens.

    With regards to your clay issue, all I can say is that I have an Atropurpureum in my front yard, mostly in clay. And it's doing quite well. I think the biggest thing is drainage. A problem could arise by digging a larger hole and amending the soil, in that you could create a bowl for water to sit in. If you dig up a hole, then make the soil nice and fast draining, water could collect at the bottom where the clay is. You could always build a slightly raised planting area if you are concerned. Just be sure to build a water dam around the trunk.
     
  7. mjplax3

    mjplax3 Member

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    cthenn

    Thanks for the tips! I have and will continue to watch it closely to see how it takes the transplant. I'd like to hear how your Tamukeyama is doing on west coast.
     
  8. cthenn

    cthenn Active Member

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    Hot and dry through the summer...Tamuke yama is supposed to be a tough guy in the heat, so we'll see!
     
  9. mjplax3

    mjplax3 Member

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    Just a quick update. I posted some early spring shots in the photos forum.
    http://http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=1969

    I know this is sort of a new topic but I did notice mild aphid infestation, I've been spraying soapy water with mild success. I'm thinking about moving to an insecticide spray, any advice a good one for aphids on JMs?
     
  10. mattlwfowler

    mattlwfowler Active Member Maple Society

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    A few aphids are not worth spraying in my opinion. They will usually move on after the new shoots harden off a bit. You are more likely to do more damage to the plant with some insecticides. If you have a large infestation you should be able to wipe out the majority with safer soap or home made soapy water. I would be cautious of using any insecticide unless Japanese maples are clearly listed on the label.
     
  11. mjplax3

    mjplax3 Member

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    Thanks for the advice! I have been using the soapy water technique and its been working pretty well. I've noticed since my Tamuke yama has began leafing out, the aphids have dissipated. I think I am good to go.

    Thanks Again!
     

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