Planting a Clover Lawn

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Wes, May 13, 2008.

  1. Wes

    Wes Member

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    Peterborough, ON
    Starting a Clover Lawn

    I'm considering planting a clover lawn and have a considerable amount of weeds in what was my lawn. (the grubs killed almost all of the grass)

    Do I need to dig up the entire area or will the clover kill off the weeds over time?


    Any advice or tips?
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2008
  2. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    It would probably help to clean the area up first if you are looking for a clean lawn. I don't think clover will kill your weeds it will just grow with them. Sometimes people consider clover a pest in their lawns. If it were me I would clean it up as much as I can by tilling it and feeding the soil then seeding it...... Just be careful when it flowers. Bees if you have any left love to gather pollen. It makes for unsafe area for children and pets.

    Here is a bit of information or Google for more with "clover lawns"

    http://www.wikihow.com/Grow-a-Clover-Lawn

    http://www.diylife.com/2008/03/17/st-pats-day-shenanigans-grow-a-clover-lawn/

    Liz
     
  3. Chooch

    Chooch Active Member 10 Years

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    Just so you are aware , after 3 or 4 years the clover stand will diminish & become patchy so you would have to reseed . I have opted for the woodland approach ; gradually returning the lawn to Native flowers and other rare endangered species . It is best to perform my option one small step at a time and acquire some decent weeding tools :) Happy Growing !!
     
  4. Wes

    Wes Member

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    If I let the clover, flower and go to seed once a year (or two) will it prevent me from having to reseed?
     
  5. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Possibly but as I said the bees need to be considered and if you mow it won't happen. I like Chooch's idea of a meadow lawn. Not so sucessful here as we get too dry in summer. I guess my paddock has to substitute.

    Liz
     
  6. bijjy

    bijjy Active Member

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  7. jimweed

    jimweed Active Member 10 Years

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    Re: Starting a Clover Lawn

    Best to start from scratch. Just like you would to seed a new lawn with grasses. The Clover will not likely kill off any weeds. I remember seeing a post in here a while ago by Jimmyq, where he had installed a Clover lawn, and it looked awesome.
     
  8. cindys

    cindys Active Member

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    Jimweed...here is the link to the photos that Jimmyq posted:
    http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=25467&highlight=dutch+white+clove r.
    I think these are from Burnaby.

    Wes, much depends upon exactly what you want from the patch that you are planning to plant. Do you want something that looks lawn like (ie. a patch of green)? Do you have sun or shade; dry or wet ground? Do you want to walk on it - regularly or just once in a while? Do you have a dog that needs a loo? If you want a patch of green restfulness that you can walk on, I think the clover lawn is a good option here in Vancouver.

    I live in Vancouver (west side) and have been working on my own dutch white clover lawn since this past Autumn. I have a fairly large backyard...nearly all of it either patio or garden beds. The little rectangle of lawn was left as a patch of green restfulness (and a place for the dog to do her thing). I did not want to plant more garden. Neither did I want more patio. This section of the yard is in shade a good part of the day. There is a base of clay covered to at least 12" with good topsoil. The grass was being choked out by buttercup weed and moss. I had the grass and weeds removed and the area topped up with new topsoil. Unfortunately, this didn't happen as soon in the fall as I had hoped for but I seeded it anyway.

    Although not ideal weather conditions, about half of the area seeded came up and survived the winter. I seeded again in March and a bit more has come up. Finally, I seeded again about a week ago and it looks like this time, the rest will come up. The parts that came up last fall and survived the winter are looking really good now. I expect by the end of the summer that the whole area will look terrific. So far, I have not had an invasion of buttercup weeds.

    If, as someone else has said, I have to reseed - even annually - to even out the "lawn", that wouldn't be onerous...much less so than trying to take care of a proper lawn under my less-than-ideal circumstances. From what I understand, one can mow or not - depending upon ones desires. I expect I will mow periodically because of the dog.
     
  9. WesternWilson

    WesternWilson Active Member 10 Years

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    I just wanted to add that a clover patch is NOT a danger to children and pets. Honey bees will not attack as hornets are prone to, they will move away unless squeezed.

    Although one may wonder what to do if there is a truly bee allergic person nearby, anyone with a bee allergy will be carrying an epi pen at all times. Bees are everywhere in any case, your clover patch will not pose a specific danger.
     

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