Plant ID for monster leaved beauty

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Wanab, May 28, 2008.

  1. Wanab

    Wanab Member

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    Can anyone tell me what this plant is?
     

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  2. Wanab

    Wanab Member

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    2nd picture of my mystery plant

    Can anyone ID this plant? It is only may 28th and it is already well over 6'.
     

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  3. Lynne C

    Lynne C Member

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    The experts must all be asleep. Be very careful with this plant until they confirm its identity. It looks like giant hogweed to me, which can give you a terrible rash.
     
  4. dt-van

    dt-van Active Member 10 Years

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    I agree that your monster is Giant Hogweed, AKA Giant Cow-parsnip, which as stated can cause a serious rash and blisters if you handle it and are then exposed to sunlight. For more info see http://www.agf.gov.bc.ca/cropprot/gianthogweed.htm. Although it is very striking, you should remove it, carefully, while well dressed, and preferably on a dull day.
    Our native Cow-parsnip is smaller; a mere 1 - 3M tall and has less divided leaves. It can also cause mild photo-toxicity in sensitive people. As a children in North Vancouver, we called it "Poison Indian Rhubarb". At the time I had no idea what (if anything) was poisonous about it. We did pick it and although we never ate it I don't recall anyone getting a rash.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    As it says at the page linked to above it dies after flowering, making it monocarpic rather than perennial.
     

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