Plant evolution;

Discussion in 'Plants: Science and Cultivation' started by Chauncey Gardiner, Oct 29, 2014.

  1. Chauncey Gardiner

    Chauncey Gardiner New Member

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    Plant evolution; Monocotyledons to Dicotyledon, conifer to deciduous (perennial, annuals, biennials ) Can genetic engineering change a plant like corn to grow as a pine? In one season have multiple blooms? This could produce more food in less space without replanting new crops? What codons are involved in this adaptation, evolution from Paleozoic forests into Horsetails to similar in appearance Araucaria columnaris - Cook Pine?

    How would one go about genetically engineering a plum whose stone is that of a almond or a almond with a plums fruit? That both foods can grow from one plant ovary embryo , fruit and stone, Is its seed or pit, angiosperms, gymnosperm?
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2014
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    You need to revisit whatever you've learned about plant evolution. Start here perhaps.

    Plum-almond hybrids already exist, though not seemingly for fruit but rather rootstock. The form of genetic engineering in this case was likely traditional plant breeding.

    As for genetically engineering a plant like corn into a pine ... why? With available technologies, it'd be impossible anyway. Doubt it would ever be possible. The ancestor of Zea mays and the ancestor of Pinus split somewhere around 320-360 million years ago.
     
  3. MarkVIIIMarc

    MarkVIIIMarc Active Member

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    I am sure it will someday be possible to change enough genetic material in acorn plant to make it a pine...why is a good question.

    Far as the blooming goes, that may be more difficult because you have to balance that with the nutrients it can uptake.

    Changing what pit is in a fruit might be a slower process as the experiment will need seedlings kr at least grafts mature enough to produce fruit and in that process you will probably change the fruit.
     
  4. Chauncey Gardiner

    Chauncey Gardiner New Member

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    Monocotyledons, dicotyledon What caused this genetic transition, division to occur? Just guessing with the pine maybe monkey tree Araucaria araucana, horse tail equisetaceae . Is there a missing link in the plant kingdom? Monocotyledons have simple structure tubes, similar sea weed in the oceans, dicotyledon seem to be specialized for growing in gravity. Did one become the other if so what genes were involved?
    To grow two foods in one fruit , in less space. Feed more people less chemical federalize r pesticides, create plants that are fortified to contain all daily nutrition a vitamin vegetable. A plant that is unlike genetically modified seeds; (GMO) can pollinate other natural plants. It does not have to be corn if any plants are better compatible genetically. An onion root bulb, cucumber limb, lettuce leaf, tomato fruiting salad tree anything is possible.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2014
  5. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    I am pretty sure other people like yourself are already working on these great ideas.
     
  6. TheScarletPrince

    TheScarletPrince Member

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    Unfortunately the only thing commercial GE is being utilized for is to make the toxic agro-chemical companies rich, even if it means poisoning all life.
    The sad thing is that fact buries the real debate about GEing for the benefit of ALL, instead of to enrich a few.
     
  7. Dave-Florida

    Dave-Florida Active Member

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    There's severe limits to what's possible with genetic engineering. For example, monocot "trees" are organized entirely differently from plants with cambiums (conifers and "dicots").
     
  8. GreenLarry

    GreenLarry Active Member 10 Years

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    I very much doubt it would be possible to GM an Angiosperm into a Gymnosperm. And what would be the benefit?
     
  9. Delvi83

    Delvi83 Active Member

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    Genetic gives good results, but not all is possible....thousands genes cooperate to generate the plant you've sown !!
    There is a very tight cooperation among genes, you change 1 and it's effect can be over other 1000...it's like a complex network.
    What i want to say is that if you make too much changes, the plant could not be viable.....it's easier to get and unviable plant than to transform a Corn in Pine
     

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